Inspired to serve our nation

Army ROTC is one of the best leadership courses in the country.  It is offered at more than 1300 colleges and universities nationwide.  During your time in college, Army ROTC will complement your education with instruction in leadership development, goal setting, military science, strategy and problem solving.  Army ROTC will provide you an opportunity to develop these skills outside the classroom with practical, hands-on exercises and leadership training events.

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27 credits as follows:

 24 credits:

This is an introductory course designed to focus on the fundamental components of service as an officer in the United States Army. Students are familiarized with individual values, leadership traits and the fundamentals of officer ship. Students also learn “life skills” of physical fitness, communication applications, both oral and written, as well as interpersonal relationships. The lab provides basic instruction on squad movement techniques and the six-squad tactical missions of patrolling, attack, defense, ambush, reconnaissance, and squad battle drills. Additionally, students learn basic map reading, first aid, physical fitness, and military formations to include basic marching techniques.

This course is an orientation to leadership theory and the fundamentals of the decision-making process by learning how to solve problems and develop critical thinking skills. Students develop leadership skills and the ability to learn goal-setting techniques while working in a group interaction setting. The lab continues to provide basic instruction on squad movement techniques and the six-squad tactical missions of patrolling, attack, defense, ambush, reconnaissance, and the squad battle drills. Students are introduced to the operations order format. Additionally, students learn basic map reading, physical fitness, and basic marching techniques.

Prerequisites:

Students learn how to resolve ethical problems by applying leadership theory and principles. Students learn self-development techniques such as the importance of stress management, time management, and the ability to solve problems. Lastly, students apply communication theory and skills in a leadership study focusing on problem solving. The lab applies basic leadership theory and decision-making during practical exercises in a field environment. Students continue to develop basic map reading, physical fitness, and basic marching techniques.

Prerequisites:

Students focus primarily on leadership with an extensive examination of the unique purpose, roles, and obligations of commissioned officers. Students also focus, in detail, on the origin of our institutional values and their practical application in the decision-making process and leadership theory. Students use case studies to learn the Army’s ethical decision-making process. The lab continues to apply basic leadership theory and decision-making during practical exercises in a field environment. Students continue to develop basic map reading, physical fitness and basic marching techniques.

Prerequisites:

Permission

Students are introduced to the Leader Development Program that will be used to evaluate their leadership performance and provide developmental feedback for the remainder of their cadet years. Cadets are then taught how to plan and conduct individual and small unit training, as well as basic tactical principles. Cadets will also learn reasoning skills and the military-specific application of these skills in the form of the army’s troop. The lab reinforces small-unit tactical training while employing the troop leading procedures to accomplish planning and decision-making. Students continue to learn basic map reading, physical fitness and marching techniques.

Prerequisites:

Permission

The course focus is doctrinal leadership and tactical operations at the small-unit level. Students are provided opportunities to plan and conduct individual and collective training for Army operations. Synthesizing training, leadership and team building is the primary focus. Upon completion, students possess the fundamental confidence and competence of leadership in a small-unit setting. The lab continues reinforcing small-unit tactical training while employing the troop leading procedure to accomplish planning and decision-making. Students also continue basic map reading, physical fitness, and basic marching techniques.

Prerequisites:

Permission

This course concentrates on leadership, management, and ethics, and begins the final transition from cadet to lieutenant. Students focus on attaining the knowledge and proficiency in several critical areas they need to operate effectively as Army officers. These areas include coordinating activities with staff, counseling theory and practice within the “Army Context,” training management, and ethics. The lab sharpens the students’ leadership skills as they perform as cadet officers. Students develop and possess the fundamental skills, attributes, and abilities to operate as competent leaders in a cadet battalion. They must confidently communicate to subordinate cadets their preparedness to shoulder the responsibilities entrusted to them.

Prerequisites:

Permission

Students learn the legal aspects of decision-making and leadership. Instruction introduces the student to the organization of the Army from the tactical to the strategic level. Students learn administrative and logistical management focusing on the fundamentals of soldier and unit level support. Practical exercises require the student, both individually and collectively, to apply their knowledge to solve problems and confront situations commonly faced by junior officers. The lab continues to sharpen the students’ leadership skills. Students normally change leadership positions to hone their skills, attributes, and abilities as leaders. Again, they must confidently communicate to subordinate cadets their preparedness to shoulder the responsibilities entrusted to them.

3 credits from the following:

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from 1877 to the present will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the continuing development of race and gender relations, the impact of industrialism, the world wars and the Cold War upon American life.

Prerequisites:

A study of the American military in war and peace and its relationship to American culture and society, including social, economic, technological and political factors that influenced changes in the military and its activities from colonial times to the present.

Prerequisites:

A survey of major foreign policy issues and the conduct of diplomacy from the end of the eighteenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on twentieth century involvement of major powers in international conflicts. (Also INS 408)

A study of Europe commencing with World War I and extending to its current political and economic condition. The rise of dictatorships, trials of democracy, World War II, colonialism, post war economic revivals, social and cultural transformation, as well as the course and conclusion of the Cold War are explored.

Detailed examination of a current issue or problem in military science.

Prerequisites:

Permission

Military Science students and graduates from Military Science, with consent of department chairperson, can participate in an intensive reading, writing and training program examining contemporary military leadership and training requirements. Planning, conducting, and evaluating training will be the primary focus.

Prerequisites:

Permission

Military Science students and graduates from Military Science, with the consent of department chairperson, can participate in an intensive reading, writing and training program examining contemporary military leadership and training. Writing lesson plans, operation orders, and conducting training will be the primary focus.

Required each semester:

(Enrolled in a Military Science class)    Students participate in the United States Army’s military conditioning and fitness program designed to develop both individual fitness and the leadership skills and knowledge essential to the management of an effective organizational physical fitness program.

Mission

Fox Valley ROTC recruits, educates, develops, and inspires ROTC cadets in order to commission officers of character for the Army and develop citizens of character for a lifetime of commitment and service to the nation.

Learning Outcomes

The ROTC Program develops cadets’ skills so that they can achieve the following ROTC outcomes:

  • Live honorably and build trust
  • Demonstrate intellectual, military and physical competence
  • Think critically and creatively
  • Make sound and timely decisions
  • Develop, lead, and inspire others
  • Communicate and interact effectively
  • Pursue excellence and continue to grow
  • Seek balance, be resilient and demonstrate a strong and winning spirit

Marian University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

The Military Science Program, or Army ROTC, consists of two phases. The first is introductory, consisting of 100- and 200-level courses that include practical skills and preparatory management skills needed in the advanced phase. First-phase requirements include MSC 101, 102, 201, and 202. All freshman and sophomore students are encouraged to take the lower-level military science courses and acquaint themselves with military vocational opportunities without incurring a service obligation.

The second phase is designed to qualify upper-level student cadets for officer roles in the Active Army, Army Reserve or the Army National Guard. The advanced phase consists of MSC 301, 302, 401, and 402. Students are also required to take HIS 211: American Military History prior to commissioning as an officer. Enrollment in the advanced phase is limited to those students who qualify physically and academically, and who have either completed the first phase, the Leader’s Training Course (a six-week leadership camp attended between the sophomore and junior year), or Basic Training completed during a previous period of enlistment. Advanced phase and ROTC scholarship students are paid from $300 to $500 each month of the school year (up to $4,000 total) and participate in leadership laboratories and activities, including a field training exercise each semester and the four-week Leadership Development and Assessment Course between the junior and senior year.

In order to be commissioned as an Army officer at graduation, students must successfully complete both phases of the program and fulfill the following professional education requirements.
Professional education requirements:

  • Be able to communicate effectively orally and in writing.
  • Develop a sense of history and be acquainted with military history.

Each student schedules courses to satisfy the above requirements with the assistance and approval of the department chair.

Army ROTC financial assistance
Four-year scholarships are awarded to students entering the University as freshmen and meet all eligibility criteria. Two- and three-year scholarships are awarded to students already enrolled in the University and are active Reservists or are enrolled in the MSC 101, 102, 201, or 202 courses. Students who attend the Leader’s Training Course compete for two-year scholarships at the course. Scholarships contribute toward the cost of tuition and educational fees, and provide a fixed amount for textbooks, supplies, and equipment. Each scholarship student also receives a stipend of $300 per month for freshmen, $350 per month for sophomores, $450 per month for juniors, and $500 per month for seniors.

Special consideration for an Army ROTC scholarship is given to students pursuing degrees in nursing, mathematics, computer science, the physical sciences, and other technical skills currently in demand in the Army. Students who receive a scholarship are required to obtain an undergraduate degree in the field in which the scholarship was awarded. Non-scholarship cadets also receive the allowance of up to $4,000 for each of their two years. Cadets who attend the Leader’s Training Course and the Leadership Development and Assessment Course receive pay for attending these courses.
Labs for all courses include the following:

  • Physical fitness training (including diet and nutritional information)
  • Hands-on military skills
  • Tactical leadership training
  • Practical hands-on exercises and the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) are used as diagnostic and evaluative tools

Major Julian Smith
Assistant Professor of Military Science
920.424.3415
jgsmith94@marianuniversity.edu

Ruth Eberwine
University Services Program Associate
920.424.3400
eberwinr@uwosh.edu

Kent Sorensen
Enrollment/Scholarship Officer
920.424.3417
sorensek@uwosh.edu

The Reserve Officer Training Corps at Marian University is comprised of college students who, in addition to their academic discipline, study Military Science. Military Science is an elective managerial training program designed to develop college men and women for positions of leadership and responsibility as junior officers in the U.S. Army, Army Reserve or the Army National Guard.

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For more information, please contact:

Captain Julian Smith
Assistant Professor of Military Science
920.424.3415
jgsmith94@marianuniversity.edu

Maranda Abitz
Academic Advisor – ROTC
920.923.8970
mmabitz26@marianuniversity.edu

Ruth Eberwine
University Services Program Associate
920.424.3400
eberwinr@uwosh.edu

Kent Sorensen
Enrollment/Scholarship Officer
920.424.3417
sorensek@uwosh.edu

Related links: http://www.uwosh.edu/rotc/