Take your love for biology and use it to combat cancer

In the fight against cancer, the cytotechnologist plays a crucial role in delivering personalized patient care, and the Marian University Bachelor of Science in Biology-Cytotechnology program helps students translate their love for biology and take on opportunities in a career often dubbed disease detective. Those in the cytotechnology program learn to detect cancer cells in their earliest and potentially most curable stage. Students build skills in in detecting cell abnormalities with a microscope. Our faculty build student confidence through applied learning experiences.

The biology-cytotechnology program demonstrates how to select and perform molecular and immunologic tests for patients, assist clinicians in collecting and evaluating specimens from the body and identify precancerous cells early. Students will learn diagnostic theory and microscopy interpretation and use it to study collected materials.

Learn how to combat cancer using your love for biology!














By clicking submit, I give Marian University permission to contact me via email, phone or text regarding educational offerings.

CAREER PATHS

Graduates go on to work in medical laboratories, while others become oncologists, pathologists, researchers, writers, and teachers.

CADAVER LAB

As one of the few colleges in the area with direct access to human cadavers, the program provides hands-on experience with dissection of real human parts – not just plastic models.

SPECIALIZED TRAINING

Students participate in year-long specialized training in cytotechnology at the School of Cytotechnology, State Laboratory of Hygiene, in Madison, WI.

Request Information

The Program
The Marian University Bachelor of Science in Biology-Cytotechnology program combines the liberal arts core curriculum with challenging, hands-on learning associated with our biology degree, with a specialization in cytotechnology. You’ll be met with numerous opportunities to conduct research in the laboratory, as well as receive personalized support and instruction from passionate faculty and staff.

For more details regarding this program, view Marian’s Academic Bulletin.

General Education Program: 46-49 credits of University requirements

Biology courses, 16 credits:

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria and reactions of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites:

A second-semester general Chemistry course which introduces the topics of equilibrium, kinetics, ionic equilibria of weak electrolytes, solubility product, coordination compounds, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and descriptive chemistry. Qualitative analysis is included in the laboratory portion of this course.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

An in-depth study of the chemistry of organic compounds. This course includes nomenclature, structure, reactions, stereochemistry, an introduction to absorption spectroscopy and uses and reaction mechanisms of organic molecules.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

A continuation of CHE 201.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the techniques and methods of the organic chemistry laboratory. This course includes the synthesis of various classes of compounds, determination of properties and structures, product evaluation, introduction to various instruments and identification.

28 credits: 

Research seminars, reviews of professional biology literature, and research proposals presented by Biology majors, faculty members, and/or guest speakers.

Prerequisites:

Research preparation and training in seminar and guided research formats. Research and career seminars, reviews of professional biology literature, and research proposals are presented by Biology majors and faculty, with occasional guest speakers.

A lecture-laboratory course for science majors stressing the nature of science and scientific methodology. Basic ecological concepts and human impact on the environment are studied. The chemistry of life, the cellular basis of life, genetics, energy relationships and metabolism are presented. Both the classical aspects and the areas of recent research are included. (This course is required for Biology and Biology Education majors and Biology minors.)

Prerequisites:

A continuation of BIO 101. Major topics covered include plant and animal biology. Structural and functional relationships are stressed. Major structures, adaptations, and evolution of Monera, Protista and Animal kingdoms are surveyed. Current areas of research are included. Dissection of representative organisms including the fetal pig is required.

Prerequisites:

An extensive study of the plant kingdom and related organisms. Major topics include taxonomy, structure, morphology, development, physiology, reproduction and evolution of plants. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

Prerequisites:

A seminar based on the reading of current biological literature and the presentation of research seminars. In addition, students will prepare and present senior research proposals for a senior research project.

Prerequisites:

Topics include transmission genetics, cytogenetics, population genetics, and quantitative genetics. Laboratory emphasizes experimental observation, experimental design, hypothesis testing, and scientific writing.

Prerequisites:

A lecture / laboratory course designed to shed light on the considerable research directed at understanding the chemical reactions occurring in the cell and the relationships they bear on cellular structure and function.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to bacterial structure, metabolism, growth principles, genetics and identification. Other topics covered include antibiotics, bacteriophage and infectious diseases caused by bacteria. (Students may not take both BIO 210 and BIO 311 for credit.)

Prerequisites:

The first of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty. Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest. In this course the student will refine research methods and experimental design, including data collection, and complete initial sections of the final written report.

Prerequisites:

The second of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty. Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest. In this course the student will collect and analyze data, finish and submit a written report, and do a public presentation of his or her research.

4-8 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of cellular structure and physiology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. A strong background in biology and basic knowledge of physiological systems is assumed. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 251 is recommended.

Prerequisites:

Continuation of BIO 201. An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 252 is recommended.

Prerequisites:

A study of the biology and taxonomy of major invertebrate groups with special emphasis on structure-function relationships: their life histories, evolution, ecology and economic importance. Laboratory sessions involve the observation and dissection of representative invertebrate organisms in order that a clear understanding of each taxonomic phylum may be attained.

Prerequisites:

A study of progressive changes that occur within cells, tissues and organisms during their life span. Development at the molecular, biochemical, genetic, morphological and physiological levels are examined through lecture, discussion and laboratory exercises.

Prerequisites:

A study of the evolution and comparative structure and function of the organ systems in all major groups of the phylum chordata. Laboratory work requires dissection of lamprey, shark, mud puppy and cat with frequent reference to other representative vertebrates, especially humans.

2-6 credits:

Biology Electives

Cytotechnology courses, 8 credits:

Prerequisites:

An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of cellular structure and physiology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. A strong background in biology and basic knowledge of physiological systems is assumed. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 251 is recommended.

Prerequisites:

Continuation of BIO 201. An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 252 is recommended.

3-4 credits from the following:

A study of virus history, molecular structure and function and epidemiology. Course content is derived from current, juried papers and web sites. Students will explore how viruses impact host cellular
functions and will also look at current therapeutic and preventative regimes. An emphasis will be placed on new and emerging viral disease.

A study of several major topics in immunology. The topics include antibody structure, antigen-antibody reactions, generation of immune responses, antibody diversity and cell-mediated immunity. The
application of this information to laboratory assays and resistance to disease is also included.

4 credits:

A study of topics which includes descriptive statistics and data analysis, elementary probability, binomial, hypergeometric and normal probability models, the Central Limit Theorem, confidence intervals, elementary hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation. A major goal of this course is the application of these topics to problems arising from the natural sciences, the social sciences, the health industry, and the business environment. (This course does not fulfill the statistics requirement of Mathematics majors and minors.)

32 credits:

School of Cytotechnology

Marian University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Students in the Marian University Bachelor of Science in Biology-Cytotechnology program are immersed in both theory and practical application of biology and cytotechnology principles while enhancing their degree with a well-rounded liberal arts perspective. The BS in Biology-Cytotechnology features personalized support and quality hands-on learning and teaching experiences, all of which aim to help students achieve your personal and professional goals.

John Morris, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor & Chair
Biology & Chemistry Department
920.923.7140
jmorris@marianuniversity.edu

Those in the Marian University Bachelor of Science in Biology-Cytotechnology program learn to detect cancer cells in their earliest and potentially most curable stage. Are you ready to enter the front lines of healthcare and help combat cancer?

Apply Now

For more information, please contact:

Office of Admission
920.923.7650
admission@marianuniversity.edu

John Morris, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor & Chair
Biology & Chemistry Department
920.923.7140
jmorris@marianuniversity.edu