Inspired to start your educational journey.

You are destined to do great things. You value education and are dedicated to achieving your goals of becoming a leading health professional. That’s why you’ve chosen Marian University’s pre-professional programs.

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The Program

Marian offers several pre-professional programs, including: Pre-Dental, Pre-Medical, Pre-Occupational Therapy, Pre-Optometry, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Physical Therapy, Pre-Physician Assistant and Pre-Veterinary Medicine. While most students pursue a biology major with a chemistry minor, or a chemistry major with a biology minor as part of the programs, you may participate in the pre-professional programs within a variety of majors.

Students desiring a pre-professional degree in one of the health sciences in preparation for applying to dental, medical, veterinary, physician assistant, pharmacy, optometry, and physical therapy programs are advised to pursue a biology major/chemistry minor or a chemistry major/biology minor.

 

For more details regarding this program, view Marian’s Academic Bulletin.

General Education Program:, 46-49 credits of University requirements

Biology major, 16 credits:

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria and reactions of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites:

A second-semester general Chemistry course which introduces the topics of equilibrium, kinetics, ionic equilibria of weak electrolytes, solubility product, coordination compounds, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and descriptive chemistry. Qualitative analysis is included in the laboratory portion of this course.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

An in-depth study of the chemistry of organic compounds. This course includes nomenclature, structure, reactions, stereochemistry, an introduction to absorption spectroscopy and uses and reaction mechanisms of organic molecules.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

A continuation of CHE 201.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the techniques and methods of the organic chemistry laboratory. This course includes the synthesis of various classes of compounds, determination of properties and structures, product evaluation, introduction to various instruments and identification.

28 credits:

Research seminars, reviews of professional biology literature, and research proposals presented by Biology majors, faculty members, and/or guest speakers.

Prerequisites:

Research preparation and training in seminar and guided research formats. Research and career seminars, reviews of professional biology literature, and research proposals are presented by Biology majors and faculty, with occasional guest speakers.

A lecture-laboratory course for science majors stressing the nature of science and scientific methodology. Basic ecological concepts and human impact on the environment are studied. The chemistry of life, the cellular basis of life, genetics, energy relationships and metabolism are presented. Both the classical aspects and the areas of recent research are included. (This course is required for Biology and Biology Education majors and Biology minors.)

Prerequisites:

A continuation of BIO 101. Major topics covered include plant and animal biology. Structural and functional relationships are stressed. Major structures, adaptations, and evolution of Monera, Protista and Animal kingdoms are surveyed. Current areas of research are included. Dissection of representative organisms including the fetal pig is required.

Prerequisites:

An extensive study of the plant kingdom and related organisms. Major topics include taxonomy, structure, morphology, development, physiology, reproduction and evolution of plants. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

Prerequisites:

A seminar based on the reading of current biological literature and the presentation of research seminars. In addition, students will prepare and present senior research proposals for a senior research project.

Prerequisites:

Topics include transmission genetics, cytogenetics, population genetics, and quantitative genetics. Laboratory emphasizes experimental observation, experimental design, hypothesis testing, and scientific writing.

Prerequisites:

A lecture / laboratory course designed to shed light on the considerable research directed at understanding the chemical reactions occurring in the cell and the relationships they bear on cellular structure and function.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to bacterial structure, metabolism, growth principles, genetics and identification. Other topics covered include antibiotics, bacteriophage and infectious diseases caused by bacteria. (Students may not take both BIO 210 and BIO 311 for credit.)

Prerequisites:

The first of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty. Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest. In this course the student will refine research methods and experimental design, including data collection, and complete initial sections of the final written report.

Prerequisites:

The second of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty. Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest. In this course the student will collect and analyze data, finish and submit a written report, and do a public presentation of his or her research.

4-8 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of cellular structure and physiology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. A strong background in biology and basic knowledge of physiological systems is assumed. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 251 is recommended.

Prerequisites:

Continuation of BIO 201. An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 252 is recommended.

Prerequisites:

A study of the biology and taxonomy of major invertebrate groups with special emphasis on structure-function relationships: their life histories, evolution, ecology and economic importance. Laboratory sessions involve the observation and dissection of representative invertebrate organisms in order that a clear understanding of each taxonomic phylum may be attained.

Prerequisites:

A study of progressive changes that occur within cells, tissues and organisms during their life span. Development at the molecular, biochemical, genetic, morphological and physiological levels are examined through lecture, discussion and laboratory exercises.

Prerequisites:

A study of the evolution and comparative structure and function of the organ systems in all major groups of the phylum chordata. Laboratory work requires dissection of lamprey, shark, mud puppy and cat with frequent reference to other representative vertebrates, especially humans.

2-6 credits:

Biology electives

Chemistry minor, 12 credits:

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria and reactions of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites:

A second-semester general Chemistry course which introduces the topics of equilibrium, kinetics, ionic equilibria of weak electrolytes, solubility product, coordination compounds, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and descriptive chemistry. Qualitative analysis is included in the laboratory portion of this course.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the principles of analytical chemistry with emphasis on analytical methods involving volumetric, optical, separations and electrochemical analyses, especially for chemistry majors, pre-medical and medical students, medical technology and other students in biological sciences.

12 credits:

CHE Chemistry electives (choose from course numbers 200 and above)

Chemistry major, 34-36 credits:

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria and reactions of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites:

A second-semester general Chemistry course which introduces the topics of equilibrium, kinetics, ionic equilibria of weak electrolytes, solubility product, coordination compounds, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and descriptive chemistry. Qualitative analysis is included in the laboratory portion of this course.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

An in-depth study of the chemistry of organic compounds. This course includes nomenclature, structure, reactions, stereochemistry, an introduction to absorption spectroscopy and uses and reaction mechanisms of organic molecules.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

A continuation of CHE 201.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the techniques and methods of the organic chemistry laboratory. This course includes the synthesis of various classes of compounds, determination of properties and structures, product evaluation, introduction to various instruments and identification.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the principles of analytical chemistry with emphasis on analytical methods involving volumetric, optical, separations and electrochemical analyses, especially for chemistry majors, pre-medical and medical students, medical technology and other students in biological sciences.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to chemical instrumentation presenting theoretical and experimental aspects of solving analytical problems. The course introduces the applications of modern instruments to the detection and identification of chemical elements and compounds, covering ultraviolet, visible, infrared spectrophotometry, ESR, NMR, atomic absorption, ion exchange, gas chromatography and electrochemistry. This course also includes the interfacing of instruments to computers.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

A survey course covering topics such as chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibria, phase rule, solutions, spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, electrical and magnetic properties, and the states and structures of matter.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

A continuation of CHE 401.

A study of published sources of chemical information, their content, organization, and use. This course also involves learning techniques for preparing and giving a seminar.

A research experience for senior students investigating a problem of their choosing. This study is made under the direction of a supervising professor.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

Experimental work correlating with the theory of CHE 401 Physical Chemistry I.

Prerequisites:

DExperimental work correlating with the theory of CHE 402.

2 credits:

CHE Chemistry electives, 2 cr. (choose from course numbers above 200)

20 credits:

Prerequisites:

MAT 112 Pre-Calculus Mathematics, Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 112 with a grade of C or higher

A first course in the calculus treating functions of one variable. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of polynomial rational functions. A major emphasis of this course is the application of these concepts to problems arising out of industry, economics, business, and the sciences.

Prerequisites:

MAT 201 Calculus I, Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 201 with a grade of C or higher

A continuation of MAT 201. Topics include the study of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, analytic geometry, polar coordinates, and parametric equations.

Prerequisites:

MAT 201 Calculus I, or Corequisite

This is a lecture and laboratory course which stresses the fundamental principles of mechanics, momentum, work and energy, rotational motion and fluid statics and mechanics. The course will use calculus in derivation of the laws of physics as well as in problem-solving.

Prerequisites:

This course is a continuation of PhS 203. It will include wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics and special relativity.

Biology minor, 23 credits:

A lecture-laboratory course for science majors stressing the nature of science and scientific methodology. Basic ecological concepts and human impact on the environment are studied. The chemistry of life, the cellular basis of life, genetics, energy relationships and metabolism are presented. Both the classical aspects and the areas of recent research are included. (This course is required for Biology and Biology Education majors and Biology minors.)

Prerequisites:

A continuation of BIO 101. Major topics covered include plant and animal biology. Structural and functional relationships are stressed. Major structures, adaptations, and evolution of Monera, Protista and Animal kingdoms are surveyed. Current areas of research are included. Dissection of representative organisms including the fetal pig is required.

Prerequisites:

An extensive study of the plant kingdom and related organisms. Major topics include taxonomy, structure, morphology, development, physiology, reproduction and evolution of plants. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

Prerequisites:

Topics include transmission genetics, cytogenetics, population genetics, and quantitative genetics. Laboratory emphasizes experimental observation, experimental design, hypothesis testing, and scientific writing.

Prerequisites:

A lecture / laboratory course designed to shed light on the considerable research directed at understanding the chemical reactions occurring in the cell and the relationships they bear on cellular structure and function.

BIO Biology electives

Marian’s pre-professional programs prepare you for a variety of post-baccalaureate options, including admission into a variety of professional schools or graduate degree programs. Recent graduates have acquired a nearly 97 percent placement rate into graduate or professional programs following graduation, and include placements such as: the University of Illinois, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Marquette University, Medical College of Wisconsin, University of Arizona, San Diego State University and the University of Texas Medical Branch.

Marian University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

For nearly 80 years, Marian University has been educating leaders in the healthcare field. With a solid background in the health sciences you’ll find Marian’s pre-professional programs aim to help you become a leader in a variety of career fields.

As part of the pre-professional programs, you will gain a valuable foundation of knowledge and engage in hands-on learning experiences that will prepare your for graduate and professional study. You’ll participate in a variety of courses that will not only focus on the health sciences, but broaden your way of thinking through Marian’s liberal arts core curriculum. Your completion of courses will be guided by expert advisors, who will assist you in meeting admission requirements to graduate and professional schools across the nation.

Apply Now

For more information, please contact:

Office of Admission
920.923.7650
admission@marianuniversity.edu

John Morris, Ph.D.
920.923.7140
jmorris@marianuniversity.edu

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