Combine your passion for literature with your desire to help others grow

Those looking to share their love for reading and writing with middle and high school students can become effective and influential teachers by entering the Marian University Bachelor of Science in English Education program. Upon graduation, our students are ready for licensure in Wisconsin, having been given the knowledge, skills, and hands-on experience needed to lead classrooms and create memorable interactions.

Those in the BS in English Education program read literature from a diversity of cultures, contexts, and perspectives to help enhance their skills. Students have the opportunity to write individual creative works while learning a foundation of knowledge in student-centered teaching methods, effective classroom management, and assessment. After completion of the Bachelor of Science in English Education program, graduates are able to design coursework effectively by using a variety of strategies and will feel comfortable adapting instruction to encourage the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills for all students.

Become an English teacher and share your passion for literature














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HIT THE GROUND RUNNING

Our freshmen and sophomores are frequently exposed to real-world classrooms to help establish a self-awareness throughout the program, and to aid in mastering teaching strategies, classroom management practices, and the development of effective and engaging lessons.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

While our sophomores and juniors are exposed to real-world middle and high school classroom settings, they additionally start preparing to pass all program and DPI licensure requirements. To accomplish this, we emphasize the rigorous rubrics of the edTPA assessment framework and the transfer of theory to classroom application.

FINISHING STRONG

Our seniors engage in real-world practice, both in classroom settings and alternative field experiences at such locations as the Fond du Lac YMCA and other local organizations. This helps broaden their knowledge base on how to approach each student’s education individually, while also helping them experience a complete planning-teaching-assessment cycle.

Becoming a Classroom Leader

The English education program leads to a Bachelor of Science in Education and offers students:

  • Field experience in partner schools as early as their first semester
  • Opportunities to be placed in private and public institutions, and in different grade levels
  • Countless school districts and faculty members waiting to help graduates with job placement
  • The same clinical site for pre-clinical and clinical practice as a senior, ensuring a full school year of experience
  • Entry to the Marian Student Education Association and Kappa Delta Pi for program-specific professional development and networking
  • A personal advisor and dedicated faculty to provide personalized attention and individualized learning experiences
  • Embedded assessments in multiple courses to prepare students for program and licensure requirements

Job Outlook For Teachers

Source: BLS 8/1/2020

Welcome to the Teacher Education Program

Listen to Phil Johnson, Education Instructor, as he tells you how to become a teacher at Marian University. All instructors have real world, K-12 experience, and bring you their expertise in both public and private education. Marian's program is unique in that starting in your freshman year, you get real classroom interaction and observation. Small class sizes and courses that match up with field experiences are additional benefits. Many of our students have jobs prior to graduation.

“My educational experience at Marian University taught me to continually make the effort to not just teach and instruct with a growth mindset, but to live daily life with humility. I learned that the well-being of my future students should always be my top priority, because they might not have anyone else looking out for their best interest beyond education.”

Corbin Thompson - 2019 Marian University Graduate, Middle School ELA Teacher in the New Holstein, Wisconsin School District

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The Program

We prepare students in the Marian University English Education program to meet the challenges of today’s schools by giving them the skills they need to positively impact their classrooms and function effectively as a teacher. Those in the program gain the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary to develop the pedagogical, content, and technological skills necessary to help children. This is accomplished through extensive field experiences connected to coursework that addresses how children learn and how classroom instruction can be effective.

Wisconsin DPI Licensure: Early Adolescence-Adolescence Education ages 10-21 (grades 5-12)

For more details regarding this program, view Marian’s Academic Bulletin.

Sample Course Plan:
Download Sample Course Plan

General Education Program

46-49 credits of University requirements, including

An introductory biology course for non-majors. The relationship between structure and function is emphasized at the cellular and organismic levels. A survey of taxonomy and classification, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology and ecology is provided. (May be taken as “lecture only” or concurrently with BIO 150.)

Topics correspond to lecture material, including taxonomy, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology and ecology. Dissection of a fetal pig is required. (Laboratory experiences strongly enhance and support material in BIO 100 and concurrent registration is recommended.)

A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

This course is a service-learning intensive biology course where students learn about environment stewardship through participation in the maintenance and restoration of local ecosystems, for example, stream monitoring and invasive species removal. Through the hands-on projects and selections of readings, the student will develop an understanding and appreciation for environmental stewardship. The course fulfills the one-credit laboratory requirement under general education. The course will be a hybrid course where much of the content will be delivered in an on-line format with one-day-a-week meetings to participate in field trips and stewardship projects. Due to the service learning and environmental aspects of the course, students must be able and willing to perform light labor (on the level of gardening) and a moderate amount of hiking. Students will be required to provide their own transportation to nearby locations, car pooling and cost sharing will be encouraged under Marian University’s policy on approved drivers for field trips.

A general introduction to the basic principles of chemistry and physics and their application in contemporary society. The course, for non-science and non-nursing majors, includes a laboratory experience with experiments designed to assist the student in understanding the concepts discussed in lecture.

Prerequisites:

MAT 201 Calculus I, or Corequisite

This is a lecture and laboratory course which stresses the fundamental principles of mechanics, momentum, work and energy, rotational motion and fluid statics and mechanics. The course will use calculus in derivation of the laws of physics as well as in problem-solving.

Prerequisites:

MAT 112 Pre-Calculus Mathematics, MAT 114 Algebra and Trigonometry, with a grade of C or better, or appropriate math placement test score

A one-semester lecture and laboratory physics course. Topics addressed include the fundamentals of kinematics, dynamics, statics, oscillation, electromagnetism, and optics.

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria and reactions of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites:

CHE 001 Preparatory Chemistry, or high school chemistry; MAT 001 Basic Algebra, or appropriate math placement test score

An introductory course for non-science majors. This course provides a basic knowledge of chemistry and its application to everyday life with special focus to biological and medical applications. With laboratory.

An introduction to the physical nature and processes of the earth, along with the chemical bases for them. Dynamic processes of landscape formation and change as shaped by the forces of plate tectonics, weather, and ground and surface water will be studied. Planetary geology will be introduced. The laboratories will complement lectures with both indoor study and field trips to study local examples.

A course in the basics of meteorology in which students study the atmosphere and its physical processes including large scale climatological and local weather phenomena, their impact on society and on other aspects of ecological systems. Measurement of physical characteristics such as temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity, and wind along with data collection and analysis are included in laboratory exercises. Mathematical problem-solving skills will be emphasized. Professional meteorology and climatology are examined. Unusual and dangerous weather conditions, their causes and effects are studied and students are introduced to microclimatology.

Prerequisites:

A genre-based study of short stories, drama and poetry; the course focuses on applying tools of literary analysis to the interpretation of specific works in order to increase insight and pleasure. A wide variety of works is read, representing a diversity of cultures, contexts and perspectives. Course objectives also include developing critical reading, thinking and writing skills and exploring the values-laden nature of literature.

A survey of world civilizations from human origins to the 16th century. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey of the changes which occur during the entire lifespan as people develop: physical, motor, cognitive, moral, and social-emotional. Developmental theory and research data are critically considered. Application of existing knowledge about the variables which affect the course of development is emphasized.


Corequisites:

The course will focus on the educational implications of psychological principles and theories of child and adolescent development derived from research. The application of theories and principles will emphasize components of the teaching-learning situation.

A course applying traditional rhetoric and communication theory to oral presentations. Students study, write, deliver and evaluate public speeches. Emphasis is placed on the students’ ability to speak from an outline in a variety of situations including informative speaking, persuasive speaking and demonstration speaking. All presentations are made in class and videotaped to aid in evaluation.

Foreign language requirement, 12 credits or equivalent:

Language requirement for Bachelor of Arts degree

English courses, 18 credits:

Prerequisites:

A genre-based study of short stories, drama and poetry; the course focuses on applying tools of literary analysis to the interpretation of specific works in order to increase insight and pleasure. A wide variety of works is read, representing a diversity of cultures, contexts and perspectives. Course objectives also include developing critical reading, thinking and writing skills and exploring the values-laden nature of literature.

This course serves as a gateway, providing English majors, prospective English majors, and English minors with critical tools to heighten and enhance their experiences in subsequent courses in the major and their careers. The course introduces students to critical theory and to a wide variety of critical approaches to literature, enabling them to read and interpret literature with greater insight and discernment. Students also deepen their understanding of key literary periods and movements and become more knowledgeable of developments in the evolution of significant literary genres and sub-genres. Students will also gain an appreciation for the relevance and practical applications of literary studies in personal and professional development.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the techniques of writing poetry, fiction and drama. The course is taught as a workshop, with repeated presentation and discussion of works in progress. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites:

A survey of Shakespeare’s major plays. While the emphasis is on close study of the individual works, students also consider Shakespeare’s artistic development and the plays’ historical contexts.

Prerequisites:

Students become more aware of principles and issues in grammar, linguistics, and rhetoric, particularly as they unfold historically, and apply this enhanced awareness to the development of their own writing. The course examines the stylistic elements of writing aimed at different discourse communities, including academic and business audiences, with emphasis on developing adaptability, expressiveness, and polish in students’ own writing.

Prerequisites:

The English Capstone course will allow students to reflect on their past work in English and prepare for graduate study or the job market. The class will integrate literary criticism, primary theoretical texts, and a student-directed final paper or research project. In addition, students will compile a portfolio of selected pieces of their work as an English major to be submitted to the English department for assessment purposes. Course will run as a small seminar or independent study, depending on student and department needs.

3 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

A study of major writers of Europe, Africa, Asia, and the New World, with emphasis on writers of international stature and influence. The course offers students a broad perspective on literary history from classical times to the 17th century. A chronological survey of significant work leads to discussion of problems in the historical examination of literature: the definition of movements, the relationships between society and literature, and the evolution of literary genres.

Prerequisites:

A study of major writers of Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the United States, with emphasis on writers of international stature and influence. The course offers students a broad perspective on literary history since the 17th century. A chronological survey of significant work leads to discussion of problems in the historical examination of literature: the definition of movements (such as neoclassicism, romanticism, realism), the relationships between society and literature, and the evolution of literary genres.

Prerequisites:

A study of important myths and legends from a variety of times and places, with emphasis on writers and works that have influences Western thought, arts, and culture. Using methods of formal and structural analysis, students will study works of literature, such as epics, plays, and poetry that employ mythological allusions and deal with universal symbols and themes.

3 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

An examination of major early British writers, with a focus on the interplay of aesthetic, social and cultural values; the development of literary forms and traditions; and historical contexts. Students will be introduced to major authors of cultural significance.

Prerequisites:

A wide-ranging investigation and analysis of British Romanticism, Victorianism, and Modernism. Students will be introduced to major authors of cultural significance. As with ENG 201, the course focuses on the interrelationships of aesthetic and cultural values, literary prose and historical contexts.

3 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

A study of American literature from its beginning to the Civil War, tracing the development of American writing in its cultural contexts. In lectures and discussions, students are introduced to a broad range of critical methods for approaching major American authors.

Prerequisites:

A continuation of ENG 211, tracing the evolution of American literature from the Civil War to early Postmodernism in the contexts of the social and intellectual forces that shaped it, including the impact of minority writers. In lectures and discussions, students consider critical approaches to the rise of Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and the beginnings of Postmodernism in American letters.

3 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

A topical study of literature written by women, dealing with contemporary issues and concerns. This course will focus on fiction and nonfiction texts as they are emerging in modern and contemporary times. Discussion will center upon language, form, and themes as they relate to women. The course remains open-ended, in that any specialized concerns of class members will be welcomed as texts are chosen.

Prerequisites:

A survey of the evolution of women’s literature. The course will focus upon literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, 17th and 18th centuries, 19th century and turn of the century, and Modernist and Contemporary eras written by female authors. This material will be integrated across genres and geographical contexts.

Prerequisites:

Students will analyze the work by ethnic minority writers in the United States. Doing so, they will examine the experiences of inequality, struggle, and triumph from diverse and often unheard voices.

Prerequisites:

A generally chronological survey of African-American literature from its inception to the present time. The course is designed to include a diversity of themes, styles, authors and values. Students are challenged to examine their own attitudes and understanding regarding the relationship of African-American literature to American literature and culture as a whole.

9 credits:

ENG English electives (at least 6 credits must be at the 300 level or above)

Education requirements, 3 credits:

An introductory course which studies the nature and purpose of national, state, and local government, the Constitution, and the institutions and pressures of American society.

3 credits from the following:

A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from the precontact period to 1877 will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the evolution of race and gender relations, independence, the emergence of popular democracy, the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction and the impact of industrialism and urbanization upon American life.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from 1877 to the present will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the continuing development of race and gender relations, the impact of industrialism, the world wars and the Cold War upon American life.

Middle-secondary education courses, 26 credits:


Corequisites:

An initial field-based experience focused primarily on observation. Seminars provide the student opportunities to: 1) reflect on observations and classroom experiences, 2) to be introduced to lesson planning, issues in classroom management and conflict resolution, 3) to be introduced to the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of these standards for professional goal setting, 4) develop the Portfolio for the Admission to the School of Education. (Admission to Field Experience)

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which students begin to apply theory and teaching strategies learned in education courses to initial teaching experiences. Seminars provide supplemental opportunities for the student to link theory to practice, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting and continue the development of lesson planning, issues in conflict management and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which content and pedagogies from advanced methods courses is applied to teaching experiences. Seminars provide students an opportunity to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience which places greater emphasis on the integration of content and pedagogies. Seminars provide the student an opportunity to reflect and dialogue on the multiple facets of the teaching-learning situation, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

An orientation to teaching as a profession and an overview of effective classroom management. Topics include the requirements for teacher licensure; the foundation and philosophical background of education in the United States; and issues and trends affecting education. Topics also include classroom management theories and techniques to analyze effective classroom management approaches.


Corequisites:

(For education majors only) The course that examines the role technology in the classroom. This course is designed to emphasize the use of Web 2.0, Social Media, other technologies, and learning theories and educational research in the school setting. Students will be introduced to applications that may be used in the PK-12 educational settings. Students will also look at various ways to integrate the WI State Teacher Standards, Common Core Standards, and the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) into the curriculum.


Corequisites:

The course will focus on the educational implications of psychological principles and theories of child and adolescent development derived from research. The application of theories and principles will emphasize components of the teaching-learning situation.

Prerequisites:

This course focuses on effective classroom management in grades pre-K-12, with a holistic approach utilized to enhance research, develop hands-on activities, and to develop ideas about what effective classroom management is. The course stresses practical approaches and principles which may be applied in the classroom setting. Students will study different classroom management theories and techniques and will develop ways to build upon and refine their own personal model of effective classroom management using the tools and information provided by the course.

This course addresses the characteristics of exceptional children and introduces successful inclusive teaching practices. This course will cover topics such as disability conditions, gifted and talented, legislation, collaboration, planning, assessment, response to intervention, and diversity.

Prerequisites:

Critical examination of factors that impact student learning, ie: sexual orientation, gender, religion, socio-economics, language, and age. Forces of discrimination in schools are evaluated. Particular attention is given to critical race theory, educational equity, and critical social justice theory. American Indian culture is studied. Students have opportunities to develop relationships with people from various cultural backgrounds. Includes a 10 hour field experience.

A critical appraisal of formal and informal teacher-directed evaluation ranging from standardized tests to authentic assessment. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation process and interpretation of test results.

This course is designed for teachers of adolescent students. Emphasis will be placed on teaching reading and writing in the content areas while meeting the needs of the students. Strategies for teaching comprehension in the various curricular areas will be studied to enable learners to become independent and competent readers. Students will survey literature judged to be appropriate for adolescents at various stages of their development. The course will explore options of utilizing technology in grades 6-12 in the areas of literacy. The course will explore effective ways of motivating all students to integrate literacy throughout the curriculum and methods of maintaining the integral connection between reading and writing.

A course designed to help the student to acquire the understanding and skills necessary to become an effective teacher of English at the middle and secondary level. The course stresses practical approaches and principles which may be applied during the student teaching experience. Topics include planning, teaching methods, classroom management, evaluation, grading, and curricular trends.

12 credits:

A supervised teaching experience at the secondary level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management. (1-12 cr.)

(for Middle/Secondary Education majors only)  A supervised teaching experience at the middle level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management.

Please visit the Bachelor of Science in Elementary-Middle Education program webpage to read the Professional Standards of Marian University’s education programs.

Please visit the Bachelor of Science in Elementary-Middle Education program webpage to read the Mission and Learning Outcomes of Marian University’s education programs.

Graduates of the Marian University English Education program stay one step ahead of the competition and are equipped with the essential skills that ensure success in the education field. With numerous field and student teaching experiences, students graduate prepared for middle-secondary education positions across Wisconsin.

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Marian University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Please visit the Bachelor of Science in Elementary-Middle Education program webpage to read the Admission Progression Criterion of Marian University’s Education programs.

Interested in learning more about earning a degree in English Education? We’d love to tell you more about how the Marian University Bachelor of Science in English Education can help you find your dream job in the education field.

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For more information, please contact:
Office of Admission
920.923.7650
admission@marianuniversity.edu

Dr. Kimiko Ott
Chair, Education Department
920.923.7146
kaott37@marianuniversity.edu