Inspiring students to explore chemistry.

Through combining your passions for chemistry and teaching others, you’ll make an impact on the lives of future generations. Through Marian University’s chemistry education program, you’ll enhance your knowledge and empower your students to achieve their potential in the field of chemistry.

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The Program
The chemistry education program’s courses feature a solid background in the sciences, as well as focus on critical thinking that is important for research and analysis. You’ll find courses that not only focus on laboratory experience and research in chemistry, but also enhance your knowledge in effective teaching methods. You’ll apply the chemistry curriculum in your teaching experiences, especially through effective lesson planning, student-centered classrooms and assessment.

Licensure: Early Adolescence-Adolescence Education ages 10-21 (grades 5-12)

General Education Program: 46-49 credits University requirements, including Art elective; BIO 100 and BIO 150, or BIO 104 or BIO 114; CHE 101 or CHE 103 or PHS 102 or PHS 108, or PHS 110 or PHS 203 or PHS 211; HIS 101; PSY 105; EDU 202; COM 101 or COM 232; Music elective.

General Education Program, 46-49 credits University requirements, including:

Art Elective

An introductory biology course for non-majors. The relationship between structure and function is emphasized at the cellular and organismic levels. A survey of taxonomy and classification, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology and ecology is provided. (May be taken as “lecture only” or concurrently with BIO 150.)

Topics correspond to lecture material, including taxonomy, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology and ecology. Dissection of a fetal pig is required. (Laboratory experiences strongly enhance and support material in BIO 100 and concurrent registration is recommended.)

A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

This course is a service-learning intensive biology course where students learn about environment stewardship through participation in the maintenance and restoration of local ecosystems, for example, stream monitoring and invasive species removal. Through the hands-on projects and selections of readings, the student will develop an understanding and appreciation for environmental stewardship. The course fulfills the one-credit laboratory requirement under general education. The course will be a hybrid course where much of the content will be delivered in an on-line format with one-day-a-week meetings to participate in field trips and stewardship projects. Due to the service learning and environmental aspects of the course, students must be able and willing to perform light labor (on the level of gardening) and a moderate amount of hiking. Students will be required to provide their own transportation to nearby locations, car pooling and cost sharing will be encouraged under Marian University’s policy on approved drivers for field trips.

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria and reactions of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites:

CHE 001 Preparatory Chemistry, or high school chemistry; MAT 001 Basic Algebra, or appropriate math placement test score

An introductory course for non-science majors. This course provides a basic knowledge of chemistry and its application to everyday life with special focus to biological and medical applications. With laboratory.

A general introduction to the basic principles of chemistry and physics and their application in contemporary society. The course, for non-science and non-nursing majors, includes a laboratory experience with experiments designed to assist the student in understanding the concepts discussed in lecture.

An introduction to the physical nature and processes of the earth, along with the chemical bases for them. Dynamic processes of landscape formation and change as shaped by the forces of plate tectonics, weather, and ground and surface water will be studied. Planetary geology will be introduced. The laboratories will complement lectures with both indoor study and field trips to study local examples.

A course in the basics of meteorology in which students study the atmosphere and its physical processes including large scale climatological and local weather phenomena, their impact on society and on other aspects of ecological systems. Measurement of physical characteristics such as temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity, and wind along with data collection and analysis are included in laboratory exercises. Mathematical problem-solving skills will be emphasized. Professional meteorology and climatology are examined. Unusual and dangerous weather conditions, their causes and effects are studied and students are introduced to microclimatology.

Prerequisites:

MAT 201 Calculus I, or Corequisite

This is a lecture and laboratory course which stresses the fundamental principles of mechanics, momentum, work and energy, rotational motion and fluid statics and mechanics. The course will use calculus in derivation of the laws of physics as well as in problem-solving.

Prerequisites:

MAT 112 Pre-Calculus Mathematics, MAT 114 Algebra and Trigonometry, with a grade of C or better, or appropriate math placement test score

A one-semester lecture and laboratory physics course. Topics addressed include the fundamentals of kinematics, dynamics, statics, oscillation, electromagnetism, and optics.

A survey of world civilizations from human origins to the 16th century. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey of the changes which occur during the entire lifespan as people develop: physical, motor, cognitive, moral, and social-emotional. Developmental theory and research data are critically considered. Application of existing knowledge about the variables which affect the course of development is emphasized.


Corequisites:

The course will focus on the educational implications of psychological principles and theories of child and adolescent development derived from research. The application of theories and principles will emphasize components of the teaching-learning situation.

This course focuses on the exploration of fundamental principles of effective communication. Skilled communication behaviors are developed through the study and practice of interpersonal communication, public speaking, listening, and group dynamics. Practical applications include class discussion, group activities, listening exercises, and individual presentations.

A course applying traditional rhetoric and communication theory to oral presentations. Students study, write, deliver and evaluate public speeches. Emphasis is placed on the students’ ability to speak from an outline in a variety of situations including informative speaking, persuasive speaking and demonstration speaking. All presentations are made in class and videotaped to aid in evaluation.

Music Elective

Education requirements, 15 credits:

A lecture-laboratory course for science majors stressing the nature of science and scientific methodology. Basic ecological concepts and human impact on the environment are studied. The chemistry of life, the cellular basis of life, genetics, energy relationships and metabolism are presented. Both the classical aspects and the areas of recent research are included. (This course is required for Biology and Biology Education majors and Biology minors.)

Prerequisites:

A continuation of BIO 101. Major topics covered include plant and animal biology. Structural and functional relationships are stressed. Major structures, adaptations, and evolution of Monera, Protista and Animal kingdoms are surveyed. Current areas of research are included. Dissection of representative organisms including the fetal pig is required.

A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

An introductory course which studies the nature and purpose of national, state, and local government, the Constitution, and the institutions and pressures of American society.

Education requirements, 3 credits:

A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from the precontact period to 1877 will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the evolution of race and gender relations, independence, the emergence of popular democracy, the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction and the impact of industrialism and urbanization upon American life.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from 1877 to the present will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the continuing development of race and gender relations, the impact of industrialism, the world wars and the Cold War upon American life.

Additional requirements, 20 credits:

Prerequisites:

MAT 112 Pre-Calculus Mathematics, Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 112 with a grade of C or higher

A first course in the calculus treating functions of one variable. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of polynomial rational functions. A major emphasis of this course is the application of these concepts to problems arising out of industry, economics, business, and the sciences.

Prerequisites:

MAT 201 Calculus I, Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 201 with a grade of C or higher

A continuation of MAT 201. Topics include the study of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, analytic geometry, polar coordinates, and parametric equations.

Prerequisites:

MAT 201 Calculus I, or Corequisite

This is a lecture and laboratory course which stresses the fundamental principles of mechanics, momentum, work and energy, rotational motion and fluid statics and mechanics. The course will use calculus in derivation of the laws of physics as well as in problem-solving.

Prerequisites:

This course is a continuation of PhS 203. It will include wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics and special relativity.

Middle-secondary education courses, 23 credits:


Corequisites:

An initial field-based experience focused primarily on observation. Seminars provide the student opportunities to: 1) reflect on observations and classroom experiences, 2) to be introduced to lesson planning, issues in classroom management and conflict resolution, 3) to be introduced to the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of these standards for professional goal setting, 4) develop the Portfolio for the Admission to the School of Education. (Admission to Field Experience)

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which students begin to apply theory and teaching strategies learned in education courses to initial teaching experiences. Seminars provide supplemental opportunities for the student to link theory to practice, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting and continue the development of lesson planning, issues in conflict management and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which content and pedagogies from advanced methods courses is applied to teaching experiences. Seminars provide students an opportunity to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience which places greater emphasis on the integration of content and pedagogies. Seminars provide the student an opportunity to reflect and dialogue on the multiple facets of the teaching-learning situation, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

An orientation to teaching as a profession and an overview of effective classroom management. Topics include the requirements for teacher licensure; the foundation and philosophical background of education in the United States; and issues and trends affecting education. Topics also include classroom management theories and techniques to analyze effective classroom management approaches.


Corequisites:

(For education majors only) The course that examines the role technology in the classroom. This course is designed to emphasize the use of Web 2.0, Social Media, other technologies, and learning theories and educational research in the school setting. Students will be introduced to applications that may be used in the PK-12 educational settings. Students will also look at various ways to integrate the WI State Teacher Standards, Common Core Standards, and the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) into the curriculum.


Corequisites:

The course will focus on the educational implications of psychological principles and theories of child and adolescent development derived from research. The application of theories and principles will emphasize components of the teaching-learning situation.

Prerequisites:

This course focuses on effective classroom management in grades pre-K-12, with a holistic approach utilized to enhance research, develop hands-on activities, and to develop ideas about what effective classroom management is. The course stresses practical approaches and principles which may be applied in the classroom setting. Students will study different classroom management theories and techniques and will develop ways to build upon and refine their own personal model of effective classroom management using the tools and information provided by the course.

This course addresses the characteristics of exceptional children and introduces successful inclusive teaching practices. This course will cover topics such as disability conditions, gifted and talented, legislation, collaboration, planning, assessment, response to intervention, and diversity.

Prerequisites:

Critical examination of factors that impact student learning, ie: sexual orientation, gender, religion, socio-economics, language, and age. Forces of discrimination in schools are evaluated. Particular attention is given to critical race theory, educational equity, and critical social justice theory. American Indian culture is studied. Students have opportunities to develop relationships with people from various cultural backgrounds. Includes a 10 hour field experience.

A critical appraisal of formal and informal teacher-directed evaluation ranging from standardized tests to authentic assessment. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation process and interpretation of test results.

This course is designed for teachers of adolescent students. Emphasis will be placed on teaching reading and writing in the content areas while meeting the needs of the students. Strategies for teaching comprehension in the various curricular areas will be studied to enable learners to become independent and competent readers. Students will survey literature judged to be appropriate for adolescents at various stages of their development. The course will explore options of utilizing technology in grades 6-12 in the areas of literacy. The course will explore effective ways of motivating all students to integrate literacy throughout the curriculum and methods of maintaining the integral connection between reading and writing.

Middle-secondary education courses, 12 credits:

A supervised teaching experience at the secondary level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management. (1-12 cr.)

(for Middle/Secondary Education majors only)  A supervised teaching experience at the middle level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management.

Middle-secondary education courses, 3 credits:

A course in writing objectives, building curriculum models, selecting evaluation procedures, studying existing educational systems, comparing various instructional materials and programs and observing the developmental levels of learning. Emphasis is placed on the application of inquiry in the exercise of scientific method, enabling the student to relate the processes of goal setting, planning, evaluation, and decision making to each investigation.

Chemistry courses, 34-36 credits:

An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria and reactions of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites:

A second-semester general Chemistry course which introduces the topics of equilibrium, kinetics, ionic equilibria of weak electrolytes, solubility product, coordination compounds, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and descriptive chemistry. Qualitative analysis is included in the laboratory portion of this course.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

An in-depth study of the chemistry of organic compounds. This course includes nomenclature, structure, reactions, stereochemistry, an introduction to absorption spectroscopy and uses and reaction mechanisms of organic molecules.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

A continuation of CHE 201.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the techniques and methods of the organic chemistry laboratory. This course includes the synthesis of various classes of compounds, determination of properties and structures, product evaluation, introduction to various instruments and identification.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the principles of analytical chemistry with emphasis on analytical methods involving volumetric, optical, separations and electrochemical analyses, especially for chemistry majors, pre-medical and medical students, medical technology and other students in biological sciences.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to chemical instrumentation presenting theoretical and experimental aspects of solving analytical problems. The course introduces the applications of modern instruments to the detection and identification of chemical elements and compounds, covering ultraviolet, visible, infrared spectrophotometry, ESR, NMR, atomic absorption, ion exchange, gas chromatography and electrochemistry. This course also includes the interfacing of instruments to computers.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

A survey course covering topics such as chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibria, phase rule, solutions, spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, electrical and magnetic properties, and the states and structures of matter.

A study of published sources of chemical information, their content, organization, and use. This course also involves learning techniques for preparing and giving a seminar.

A research experience for senior students investigating a problem of their choosing. This study is made under the direction of a supervising professor.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites:

Experimental work correlating with the theory of CHE 401 Physical Chemistry I.

Prerequisites:

DExperimental work correlating with the theory of CHE 402.

Chemistry courses, 2 credits:

CHE Chemistry elective (course numbers above 200)

International Society for Technology in Education
ISTE Standards for Administrators
ISTE-A Standards

Wisconsin Administrators License
WI Admin Standards

State of Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction
Licensure Program Content Guidelines

Students completing the Chemistry Education major meet Student Learning Outcomes for both the Chemistry program and Education program.

Mission:

The Chemistry and Physics Program offers both majors and minors in Chemistry and Chemistry Education. Through effective teaching, advising and scholarly activity, the Chemistry and Physics Program prepares students to engage in scientific inquiry and thought, select and pursue appropriate career options, become productive members of our scientific and technological society, and develop an appreciation of their own capabilities and accomplishments.
In addition, the Chemistry and Physic Program services other programs at Marian by providing necessary background science courses needed for their fields, particularly the Biology and Forensic Science programs, the School of Education, and the School of Nursing and Health Professions.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to complete laboratory tasks using proper lab techniques and equipment.
  • Students will be able to deduce an approach and implement a solution.
  • Students will be able to access and evaluate relevant chemical literature for the purposes of research.
  • Students will be able to use proper lab hygiene and safety procedures.
  • Students will be able to research and present results that are clear, relevant, accurate and precise.
  • Students will be able to work cooperatively to perform documented laboratory experiments and in class exercises.
  • Students will be able to adhere to ethical standards in all work.
  • Students will be able to acquire knowledge of chemistry.


Teacher Education Department Mission

The mission of Teacher Education Programs is to prepare candidates for the teaching profession by providing candidates with the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary to assist them to develop the pedagogical, content, and technological skills necessary to function effectively as a teacher in the areas of early childhood, elementary, middle school, and secondary education.

Program Learning Outcomes
After completion of this program, candidates will demonstrate:

  1. An understanding of the teaching standards, including the knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected of a professional teacher.
  2. Academic competence in a broad base of general education and in a major appropriate for the licensure being sought and demonstrate knowledge of a variety of effective teaching methods and materials (including technology) which utilize skills that effectively apply content knowledge and knowledge of children and adolescents to the learning environment.
  3. The ability to design instruction effectively using a variety of instructional strategies and adapting instruction to encourage the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills for all students. Candidates also reflect on the instructional process to improve future teaching and learning experiences.
  4. An understanding and an ability to design, assess, and evaluate (both formal and informal) assessments for student learning and reflects on the assessment process to improve future teaching and learning experiences.
  5. An understanding of a diverse student population and apply appropriate instructional strategies and assessments that acknowledge sensitivity to students’ diverse learning needs.

With many opportunities to teach, students in the chemistry education program learn hands-on with quality teachers in local private and public schools. As a graduate of the chemistry education program, you’ll find career success, both in the laboratory and in middle and high school classrooms in Wisconsin and across the nation.

School of Education Assessment Reports

2014-15 Annual Analysis: Teacher Education Undergraduate Programs

The chemistry program prepares you for a variety of post-baccalaureate options, including professional employment and graduate studies. Our graduates have the foundation needed to pursue careers in a variety of areas, ranging from analytical laboratories, biotechnology, chiropractic medicine, dentistry and pharmacy, to education, research and development and technology.

Over the three year period of 2011-14, the average number of graduating chemistry majors was 3.0 students per year. Of the students who responded to a post-graduation survey, 100% had either found employment in the field or had continued on into graduate school.

Within the major, based on review of program learning outcomes chemistry has adopted a new assessment plan to align with American Chemical Society Standards around eight Student Learning Outcomes and we are in the first year of data collection in this system; data will be posted as it becomes available.

Students who take chemistry courses (majors and non-majors) receive significant support through the general education program in developing knowledge acquisition (78.4% meet or exceed benchmark) and critical thinking (82.6%).

The Education Programs offered by the Marian University School of Education are approved by the:

wi-dept-public-instruction-logo         aacte-logo          caep-logo

Marian University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Admission To The School of Education

Admission to the School of Education is required for continuation in education courses. The student must meet the following criteria:

1. A minimum cumulative grade point average upon completion of the following minimum number of credits:
2.85 GPA on a minimum of 40 credits
3.00 GPA on a minimum of 60 credits
3
.00 GPA on a minimum of 75 credits
3.00 GPA on a minimum of 90 credits

(Courses designated 001 are not calculated in the cumulative grade point average.)

2. Reported passing scores on all components of the Praxis Core (Pre-professional Skills Tests-Praxis I if tests are taken prior to September 1, 2014)

Minimum passing scores on the Praxis I (Pre-professional Skills Tests – (PPST)

Scores
Reading 175
Writing 174
Mathematics 173

Reported scores on the Praxis Core Test ( Praxis ® Core Academic Skills for Educators Tests) if tests are taken after September 1, 2014
Scores

Reading 156
Writing 162
Mathematics 150

3. Successful completion of EDU 010 Field Experience One (grade of “B” or better)

4. Successful completion of EDU 100 Introduction to Education (grade of “B” or better)

5. Proficiency in speaking and listening (grade of “C” or better in COM 101 or COM 232)

6. Completion of EDU 200 Technology in Education (grade of “B” or better)

7. Completion of EDU 202 Psychology of Learning (grade of “B” or better)

8. Minimum GPA of 2.50 in Chemistry Courses

9. Successful Completion of the Admission to the School of Education Portfolio

School of Arts & Sciences Faculty (SAS)

John Morris, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor & Chair
920.923.7140
jmorris@marianuniversity.edu

Tom Richardson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
920.923.8790
TRichardson@marianuniversity.edu

Sarah Garvey, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Chemistry Department
920.923.7609
slgarvey00@marianuniversity.edu

Joseph Cannistra, B.S.
Assistant Professor
920.923.7645
jccannistra91@marianuniversity.edu

School of Education Faculty (SoE)

Kathy McCord, M.S.
Instructor
920.923.7637
kmccord@marianuniversity.edu

Polly Manske, M.S.
Assistant Professor
920.923.7151
pkmanske52@marianuniversity.edu

Aida Michlowski, Ph.D.
Professor
920.923.8749
amichlowski@marianuniversity.edu

Sr. Cyndi Nienhaus, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
920.923.6712
canienhaus06@marianuniversity.edu

Kristi Reitz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
920.923.7177
klreitz64@marianuniversity.edu

Sr. Catherine Stewart, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
920.923.8099
cmstewart97@marianuniversity.edu

Sue Stoddart, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
920.923.7170
sstoddart@marianuniversity.edu

Robert Wagner, M.E.
Instructor
920.923.8152
bwagner@marianuniversity.edu

With Marian’s legacy in education, your experience in the chemistry education program will combine knowledge gained in class to the classroom experience, especially through field experiences and a semester-long student teaching experience. Graduates of the program will be certified to teach students in grades 5-12.

Apply Now

For more information, please contact:
Office of Admission
920.923.7650
admission@marianuniversity.edu

Associate Professor & Chair, Chemistry Department
John Morris, Ph.D.
1.800.262.7426 ext. 7140
JMorris@marianuniversity.edu

Dean, School of Education
Dr. Sue Stoddart
1-800-262-7426 ext. 8100
sstoddart@marianuniversity.edu

Assistant Professor, Chair, Teacher Education Department
Dr. Kristi Reitz
1-800-262-7426 ext. 7177
klreitz64@marianuniversity.edu

Support Staff
Ms. Leah Schraeder, Support Specialist III
1-800-262-7426 ext. 8128
laschraeder27@marianuniversity.edu

Certification Officer/Advisor
Ms. Joan Ferguson
1-800-262-7426 ext. 8778
jferguson@marianuniversity.edu

Director of Field & Clinical Experiences
Mr. Phil Johnson
1-800-262-7426 ext.8752

prjohnson91@marianuniversity.edu