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The Program

The Bachelor of Science in Broad Field Social Studies Education program features our core liberal arts courses and a challenging curriculum built on history and social studies. At Marian University, students find personalized support and instruction delivered by passionate faculty and staff and engage in field experiences as early as their freshman year.

Wisconsin DPI Licensure: Early Adolescence-Adolescence Education Grades 5-12

 

For more details regarding this program, view Marian’s Academic Bulletin.

Sample Course Plan:
Download Sample Course Plan

General Education Program

46-49 credits of University requirements, including:

A survey of world civilizations from human origins to the 16th century. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

Broad field social studies courses

56 credits as follows:
19 credits:

 

A survey of world civilizations from human origins to the 16th century. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from the precontact period to 1877 will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the evolution of race and gender relations, independence, the emergence of popular democracy, the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction and the impact of industrialism and urbanization upon American life.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from 1877 to the present will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the continuing development of race and gender relations, the impact of industrialism, the world wars and the Cold War upon American life.

Prerequisites:

A survey of the cultural, economic, political and social history of Wisconsin from the days of exploration to the present. The class emphasizes independent research and discussion.

Students will begin the design and research for a project related to their area of interest and career aspirations.

Prerequisites:

Students will complete the project begun in HIS 395.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

A study of the development of the church from apostolic times to the Reformation. Significant figures in the history of the church are studied with stress on the interaction of the church and the world.

Prerequisites:

A study of church history from the Reformation to the present. The course focuses on the influence of the church on the world rather than on doctrinal matters.

Prerequisites:

A survey of English history from ancient times to the present. Special attention will be given to the social, political, and economic developments that have influenced the course of English history.

Prerequisites:

A study of the European powers during the period 1815-1914. Concepts such as liberalism, nationalism, conservatism, democracy and socialism are critically examined. The course concludes with an examination of the origins of World War I.

A study of Europe commencing with World War I and extending to its current political and economic condition. The rise of dictatorships, trials of democracy, World War II, colonialism, post war economic revivals, social and cultural transformation, as well as the course and conclusion of the Cold War are explored.

Prerequisites:

A study of various controversies within European history from ancient times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of European history in a seminar type format. The topic(s) is drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

The class explores the multiplicity of approaches historians use to conduct research, engage in historical preservation, present history to public audiences via historical societies, electronic media, and museums. The course is designed to familiarize the student with not only the historiography of public history, but also the theories and practice behind the presentation of history to public audiences. Pedagogical approaches include in-class study, presentations by public history practitioners, site visits, and through Service-Learning at an appropriate public history venue.

A study of American federalism from 1787 to the present as manifested in the interpretation of the Constitution by the federal courts. The course focuses upon federal-state relations over time. Upon successful completion of the course students will have developed an understanding of federal supremacy and its changing nature in a political context.

Prerequisites:

A survey of major foreign policy issues and the conduct of diplomacy from the end of the eighteenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on twentieth century involvement of major powers in international conflicts. (Also INS 408)

Prerequisites:

A seminar dealing with the political, economic, intellectual and social trends of the United States since 1933. Topics for discussion include the New Deal, World War II, Cold War adn the dramatic political, economic, foreign policy, social and cultural changes in American society during the last forty years.

Prerequisites:

A study of the history of American Indians from precontact times to the present. Special attention is given to issues surrounding the continuing effect of contact/discovery, upon American Indians in a cultural, political and economic context.

Prerequisites:

A study of the causes and course of the Civil War as well as its consequences for subsequent American history. The course will focus upon the key issues of slavery and race relations, the effect of industrialization upon sectional tensions, southern particularism and the social and political life of the era.

Prerequisites:

A study of various controversies within American history from colonial times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

Prerequisites:

An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of American history in a seminar type format. The topic(s) are drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

Provides the student with an opportunity to explore topics in ancient history from a Western or non-Western social, political and economic framework.

Prerequisites:

A survey of events in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the current day.

Prerequisites:

A survey of economic, political, religious, and social change ad continuity in Latin America from the pre-colonial period to the present day. Latin America is defined as including the Caribbean Islands, Mexico, Central America and South America.

Prerequisites:

A topical survey of the history of African peoples from human origins to the present. Regional historical developments; African social and political patterns; the impact of external contacts; imperialism and colonialism; nationalism and independence; current issues in Africa.

Prerequisites:

A survey of civilizations in monsoon Asia from prehistory to the present. Emphasis is placed on cultural, political and social development of China, Japan and India, with some attention to Korea, Central Asia and Southeast Asia.

Prerequisites:

A study of various controversies within World history from ancient times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

Prerequisites:

An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of world history in a seminar type format. The topics are drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

Other credits required for teacher licensure
Education requirements

13 credits:

A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the overall functioning of an economic system with a view toward understanding the factors underlying income, employment, and prices on the aggregate level. Topics include such monetary and fiscal policies as suggested by the relevant theories discussed.

Prerequisites:

This course is an introduction to microeconomics: the study of how households and firms interact and make decisions to allocate limited resources in the markets for goods and services.

A cultural, political, economic and physical survey of the realms and regions of the world. Special attention will be given to human spatial interaction in a global context.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

An investigation of the influences of social factors on individual behavior, the role of social cognition when people interact, interpersonal and group dynamics, and application of social-psychological research data to various situations.

Prerequisites:

This course explores the major types of psychopathology to include anxiety disorders, personality disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, organic brain disorders, substance-related disorders, somatoform disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders, sleeping disorders, mental retardation, adjustment disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders, impulse control disorders and delirium, dementia and amnestic disorders. Emphasis is given to the issues surrounding classification, etiology and treatment.

This course examines the underlying basis for human skills in learning, perception, attention and memory, language, problem solving, and decision-making. The focus is on current knowledge about the processes, structures, and mechanisms that contribute to human cognition. Some application of this knowledge to fields such as law, education, and clinical psychology will be included.

Middle-secondary education major courses

41 credits:


Corequisites:

An initial field-based experience focused primarily on observation. Seminars provide the student opportunities to: 1) reflect on observations and classroom experiences, 2) to be introduced to lesson planning, issues in classroom management and conflict resolution, 3) to be introduced to the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of these standards for professional goal setting, 4) develop the Portfolio for the Admission to the School of Education. (Admission to Field Experience)

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which students begin to apply theory and teaching strategies learned in education courses to initial teaching experiences. Seminars provide supplemental opportunities for the student to link theory to practice, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting and continue the development of lesson planning, issues in conflict management and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which content and pedagogies from advanced methods courses is applied to teaching experiences. Seminars provide students an opportunity to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience which places greater emphasis on the integration of content and pedagogies. Seminars provide the student an opportunity to reflect and dialogue on the multiple facets of the teaching-learning situation, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

An orientation to teaching as a profession and an overview of effective classroom management. Topics include the requirements for teacher licensure; the foundation and philosophical background of education in the United States; and issues and trends affecting education. Topics also include classroom management theories and techniques to analyze effective classroom management approaches.


Corequisites:

(For education majors only) The course that examines the role technology in the classroom. This course is designed to emphasize the use of Web 2.0, Social Media, other technologies, and learning theories and educational research in the school setting. Students will be introduced to applications that may be used in the PK-12 educational settings. Students will also look at various ways to integrate the WI State Teacher Standards, Common Core Standards, and the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) into the curriculum.


Corequisites:

The course will focus on the educational implications of psychological principles and theories of child and adolescent development derived from research. The application of theories and principles will emphasize components of the teaching-learning situation.

This course addresses the characteristics of exceptional children and introduces successful inclusive teaching practices. This course will cover topics such as disability conditions, gifted and talented, legislation, collaboration, planning, assessment, response to intervention, and diversity.

Prerequisites:

Critical examination of factors that impact student learning, ie: sexual orientation, gender, religion, socio-economics, language, and age. Forces of discrimination in schools are evaluated. Particular attention is given to critical race theory, educational equity, and critical social justice theory. American Indian culture is studied. Students have opportunities to develop relationships with people from various cultural backgrounds. Includes a 10 hour field experience.

A critical appraisal of formal and informal teacher-directed evaluation ranging from standardized tests to authentic assessment. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation process and interpretation of test results.

Exploration of theoretical reading foundations and current best practices to develop understanding of literacy in the content areas. Emphasis is placed on motivation, cognition, memory, and verbal processing as applied to reading methodology. Students will develop and implement lessons integrating reading strategies in content areas, assess results, and use data to design subsequent reading interventions.

12 credits:

A supervised teaching experience at the secondary level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management. (1-12 cr.)

(for Middle/Secondary Education majors only)  A supervised teaching experience at the middle level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management.

3 credits from the following:

This course makes the student cognizant of the chief areas of knowledge that are necessary for teaching foreign languages at all levels. It presents a unique audio-lingual approach followed by the skillful integration of reading and writing. Topics include classroom management, theories, principles, and practical classroom applications of instructional strategies and curriculum development for teaching foreign languages.

A course designed to help the student to acquire the understanding and skills necessary to become an effective teacher of English at the middle and secondary level. The course stresses practical approaches and principles which may be applied during the student teaching experience. Topics include planning, teaching methods, classroom management, evaluation, grading, and curricular trends.

Designed to assist aspirant social studies teachers in establishing curricular objectives; planning for instruction; evaluating learning in the social studies area; incorporating a variety of strategies and approaches in social studies education; and in promoting a sense of professionalism in the content area. Aspirant social studies teachers interact with area practitioners, make site visits, and engage in other appropriate activities.

A course in writing objectives, building curriculum models, selecting evaluation procedures, studying existing educational systems, comparing various instructional materials and programs and observing the developmental levels of learning. Emphasis is placed on the application of inquiry in the exercise of scientific method, enabling the student to relate the processes of goal setting, planning, evaluation, and decision making to each investigation.

A study of the goals and objectives of mathematics education in the middle and secondary school, the current trends in curriculum, instruction, assessment and evaluation, and the methods and materials used in teaching mathematics.

Please visit the Elementary-Middle Education webpage to read the Professional Standards of Marian University’s Education programs.

Please visit the Elementary-Middle Education webpage to read the Mission and Learning Outcomes of Marian University’s Education programs.

The Bachelor of Science in Broad Field Social Studies Education program, with a middle-secondary education license through the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, allows students to teach any history or social studies class at the middle to high school level. Graduates teach in school districts across Wisconsin and have graduated from law school or worked in government, corrections, the military, and social work.

2014-15 Annual Analysis: Teacher Education Undergraduate Programs

The education programs offered by the Marian University School of Education are approved by the:

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education

Marian University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Please visit the Elementary-Middle Education webpage to read the Admission Progression Criterion of Marian University’s Education programs.

Philip Johnson, M.S.
Instructor
920.923.8752
prjohnson91@marianuniversity.edu

Polly Manske, M.S.
Assistant Professor
920.923.7151
pkmanske52@marianuniversity.edu

 

As part of the Marian University Bachelor of Science in Broad Field Social Studies Education program, students will be met with a balance of theory and practice in social sciences, history, government, economics, geography, international studies, and sociology. With extensive knowledge in these areas, graduates are prepared to teach history and other social studies courses, especially following ample experiences at the front of the classroom.