Exploring the past, inspiring the future.

You enjoy traveling the world and exploring society from years ago. The lives of people and events of the past have inspired you to utilize the historical perspective in your way of thinking and sharing your knowledge with others. That’s why choosing a major in broad field social studies education at Marian combines your two passions and allows you to engage future students in history and social sciences.

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The Program
The broad field social studies education program features Marian’s core liberal arts courses and a challenging curriculum built on the areas of history and social studies. At Marian, you’ll find personalized support and instruction from passionate faculty and staff, as well as engage in student teaching experiences as early as your sophomore year.

Licensure: Early Adolescence-Adolescence Education ages 10-21 (grades 5-12)

 

For more details regarding this program, view Marian’s Academic Bulletin.

Sample Course Plan:
Download Sample Course Plan

General Education Program

46-49 credits of University requirements, including:

A survey of world civilizations from human origins to the 16th century. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

Broad field social studies courses

18 credits:

A survey of world civilizations from human origins to the 16th century. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political and economic development of humankind in a global context.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from the precontact period to 1877 will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the evolution of race and gender relations, independence, the emergence of popular democracy, the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction and the impact of industrialism and urbanization upon American life.

A survey course in which the cultural, political and economic events that have shaped American history from 1877 to the present will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics including the continuing development of race and gender relations, the impact of industrialism, the world wars and the Cold War upon American life.

Prerequisites:

A survey of the cultural, economic, political and social history of Wisconsin from the days of exploration to the present. The class emphasizes independent research and discussion.

Prerequisites:

A review of primary sources and techniques for research in history. Development of familiarity with the techniques of writing of historical prose.

Prerequisites:

An exploration of modes of historical thinking and their relationship to the development of the senior paper.

Prerequisites:

Writing and editing the senior paper, an original piece of historical prose. Public presentation of the resulting work.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

A study of the development of the church from apostolic times to the Reformation. Significant figures in the history of the church are studied with stress on the interaction of the church and the world.

Prerequisites:

A study of church history from the Reformation to the present. The course focuses on the influence of the church on the world rather than on doctrinal matters.

Prerequisites:

A survey of English history from ancient times to the present. Special attention will be given to the social, political, and economic developments that have influenced the course of English history.

Prerequisites:

A study of the European powers during the period 1815-1914. Concepts such as liberalism, nationalism, conservatism, democracy and socialism are critically examined. The course concludes with an examination of the origins of World War I.

A study of Europe commencing with World War I and extending to its current political and economic condition. The rise of dictatorships, trials of democracy, World War II, colonialism, post war economic revivals, social and cultural transformation, as well as the course and conclusion of the Cold War are explored.

Prerequisites:

A study of various controversies within European history from ancient times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of European history in a seminar type format. The topic(s) is drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

The class explores the multiplicity of approaches historians use to conduct research, engage in historical preservation, present history to public audiences via historical societies, electronic media, and museums. The course is designed to familiarize the student with not only the historiography of public history, but also the theories and practice behind the presentation of history to public audiences. Pedagogical approaches include in-class study, presentations by public history practitioners, site visits, and through Service-Learning at an appropriate public history venue.

A study of American federalism from 1787 to the present as manifested in the interpretation of the Constitution by the federal courts. The course focuses upon federal-state relations over time. Upon successful completion of the course students will have developed an understanding of federal supremacy and its changing nature in a political context.

Prerequisites:

A survey of major foreign policy issues and the conduct of diplomacy from the end of the eighteenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on twentieth century involvement of major powers in international conflicts. (Also INS 408)

Prerequisites:

A seminar dealing with the political, economic, intellectual and social trends of the United States since 1933. Topics for discussion include the New Deal, World War II, Cold War adn the dramatic political, economic, foreign policy, social and cultural changes in American society during the last forty years.

Prerequisites:

A study of the history of American Indians from precontact times to the present. Special attention is given to issues surrounding the continuing effect of contact/discovery, upon American Indians in a cultural, political and economic context.

Prerequisites:

A study of the causes and course of the Civil War as well as its consequences for subsequent American history. The course will focus upon the key issues of slavery and race relations, the effect of industrialization upon sectional tensions, southern particularism and the social and political life of the era.

Prerequisites:

A study of various controversies within American history from colonial times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

Prerequisites:

An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of American history in a seminar type format. The topic(s) are drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

Provides the student with an opportunity to explore topics in ancient history from a Western or non-Western social, political and economic framework.

Prerequisites:

A survey of events in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the current day.

Prerequisites:

A survey of economic, political, religious, and social change ad continuity in Latin America from the pre-colonial period to the present day. Latin America is defined as including the Caribbean Islands, Mexico, Central America and South America.

Prerequisites:

A topical survey of the history of African peoples from human origins to the present. Regional historical developments; African social and political patterns; the impact of external contacts; imperialism and colonialism; nationalism and independence; current issues in Africa.

Prerequisites:

A survey of civilizations in monsoon Asia from prehistory to the present. Emphasis is placed on cultural, political and social development of China, Japan and India, with some attention to Korea, Central Asia and Southeast Asia.

Prerequisites:

A study of various controversies within World history from ancient times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

Prerequisites:

An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of world history in a seminar type format. The topics are drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

Education requirements

13 credits:

A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

Prerequisites:

An introduction to the overall functioning of an economic system with a view toward understanding the factors underlying income, employment, and prices on the aggregate level. Topics include such monetary and fiscal policies as suggested by the relevant theories discussed.

Prerequisites:

This course is an introduction to microeconomics: the study of how households and firms interact and make decisions to allocate limited resources in the markets for goods and services.

A cultural, political, economic and physical survey of the realms and regions of the world. Special attention will be given to human spatial interaction in a global context.

6 credits from the following:

Prerequisites:

An investigation of the influences of social factors on individual behavior, the role of social cognition when people interact, interpersonal and group dynamics, and application of social-psychological research data to various situations.

Prerequisites:

This course explores the major types of psychopathology to include anxiety disorders, personality disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, organic brain disorders, substance-related disorders, somatoform disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders, sleeping disorders, mental retardation, adjustment disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders, impulse control disorders and delirium, dementia and amnestic disorders. Emphasis is given to the issues surrounding classification, etiology and treatment.

This course examines the underlying basis for human skills in learning, perception, attention and memory, language, problem solving, and decision-making. The focus is on current knowledge about the processes, structures, and mechanisms that contribute to human cognition. Some application of this knowledge to fields such as law, education, and clinical psychology will be included.

Middle-secondary education courses

23 credits:


Corequisites:

An initial field-based experience focused primarily on observation. Seminars provide the student opportunities to: 1) reflect on observations and classroom experiences, 2) to be introduced to lesson planning, issues in classroom management and conflict resolution, 3) to be introduced to the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of these standards for professional goal setting, 4) develop the Portfolio for the Admission to the School of Education. (Admission to Field Experience)

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which students begin to apply theory and teaching strategies learned in education courses to initial teaching experiences. Seminars provide supplemental opportunities for the student to link theory to practice, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting and continue the development of lesson planning, issues in conflict management and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience in which content and pedagogies from advanced methods courses is applied to teaching experiences. Seminars provide students an opportunity to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

A supervised field-based experience which places greater emphasis on the integration of content and pedagogies. Seminars provide the student an opportunity to reflect and dialogue on the multiple facets of the teaching-learning situation, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

An orientation to teaching as a profession and an overview of effective classroom management. Topics include the requirements for teacher licensure; the foundation and philosophical background of education in the United States; and issues and trends affecting education. Topics also include classroom management theories and techniques to analyze effective classroom management approaches.


Corequisites:

(For education majors only) The course that examines the role technology in the classroom. This course is designed to emphasize the use of Web 2.0, Social Media, other technologies, and learning theories and educational research in the school setting. Students will be introduced to applications that may be used in the PK-12 educational settings. Students will also look at various ways to integrate the WI State Teacher Standards, Common Core Standards, and the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) into the curriculum.


Corequisites:

The course will focus on the educational implications of psychological principles and theories of child and adolescent development derived from research. The application of theories and principles will emphasize components of the teaching-learning situation.

Prerequisites:

This course focuses on effective classroom management in grades pre-K-12, with a holistic approach utilized to enhance research, develop hands-on activities, and to develop ideas about what effective classroom management is. The course stresses practical approaches and principles which may be applied in the classroom setting. Students will study different classroom management theories and techniques and will develop ways to build upon and refine their own personal model of effective classroom management using the tools and information provided by the course.

This course addresses the characteristics of exceptional children and introduces successful inclusive teaching practices. This course will cover topics such as disability conditions, gifted and talented, legislation, collaboration, planning, assessment, response to intervention, and diversity.

Prerequisites:

A critical examination of factors that impact student learning, ie: sexual orientation, gender, religion, socioeconomics, language, and age. The Native American culture is studied. Particular attention is given to critical race theory, educational equity and critical social justice theory as foundational to intercultural studies for educators. Students are expected to develop relationships with people from various cultural backgrounds, and they are expected to evaluate and assess forces of discrimination in schools today. This course fulfills the requirements put forth under PI 34.15(c).

A critical appraisal of formal and informal teacher-directed evaluation ranging from standardized tests to authentic assessment. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation process and interpretation of test results.

This course is designed for teachers of adolescent students. Emphasis will be placed on teaching reading and writing in the content areas while meeting the needs of the students. Strategies for teaching comprehension in the various curricular areas will be studied to enable learners to become independent and competent readers. Students will survey literature judged to be appropriate for adolescents at various stages of their development. The course will explore options of utilizing technology in grades 6-12 in the areas of literacy. The course will explore effective ways of motivating all students to integrate literacy throughout the curriculum and methods of maintaining the integral connection between reading and writing.

Designed to assist aspirant social studies teachers in establishing curricular objectives; planning for instruction; evaluating learning in the social studies area; incorporating a variety of strategies and approaches in social studies education; and in promoting a sense of professionalism in the content area. Aspirant social studies teachers interact with area practitioners, make site visits, and engage in other appropriate activities.

12 credits:

A supervised teaching experience at the secondary level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management. (1-12 cr.)

(for Middle/Secondary Education majors only)  A supervised teaching experience at the middle level which provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management.

32 credits:

University electives

International Society for Technology in Education
ISTE Standards for Teachers
ISTE-T Standards

InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards
InTasc Standards

Wisconsin Teacher Standards
WI Teacher Standards

Teacher Education Department Mission

The mission of Teacher Education Programs is to prepare candidates for the teaching profession by providing candidates with the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary to assist them to develop the pedagogical, content, and technological skills necessary to function effectively as a teacher in the areas of early childhood, elementary, middle school, and secondary education.

Program Learning Outcomes

After completion of this program, candidates will demonstrate:

  1. An understanding of the teaching standards, including the knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected of a professional teacher.
  2. Academic competence in a broad base of general education and in a major appropriate for the licensure being sought and demonstrate knowledge of a variety of effective teaching methods and materials (including technology) which utilize skills that effectively apply content knowledge and knowledge of children and adolescents to the learning environment.
  3. The ability to design instruction effectively using a variety of instructional strategies and adapting instruction to encourage the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills for all students. Candidates also reflect on the instructional process to improve future teaching and learning experiences.
  4. An understanding and an ability to design, assess, and evaluate (both formal and informal) assessments for student learning and reflects on the assessment process to improve future teaching and learning experiences.
  5. An understanding of a diverse student population and apply appropriate instructional strategies and assessments that acknowledge sensitivity to students’ diverse learning needs.

The broad field social studies education program, which is coupled with a middle-secondary education license through the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, allows you to teach any history or social studies class at the middle to high school level. Graduates not only teach in school districts across Wisconsin, but have gone on to graduate or law school, or worked in government, corrections, the military and social work.

School of Education Assessment Reports

2014-15 Annual Analysis: Teacher Education Undergraduate Programs

wi-dept-public-instruction-logo         aacte-logo          caep-logo

Marian University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Admission To The School of Education

Admission to the School of Education is required for continuation in education courses. The student must meet the following criteria:

1. A minimum cumulative grade point average upon completion of the following minimum number of credits:
2.85 GPA on a minimum of 40 credits
3.00 GPA on a minimum of 60 credits
3.00 GPA on a minimum of 75 credits

3.00 GPA on a minimum of 90 credits

(Courses designated 001 are not calculated in the cumulative grade point average.)

2. Reported passing scores on all components of the Praxis Core (Pre-professional Skills Tests-Praxis I if tests are taken prior to September 1, 2014)

Minimum passing scores on the Praxis I (Pre-professional Skills Tests – (PPST)Scores
Reading 175
Writing 174
Mathematics 173

Reported scores on the Praxis Core Test ( Praxis ® Core Academic Skills for Educators Tests) if tests are taken after September 1, 2014
Scores

Reading 156
Writing 162
Mathematics 150

3. Successful completion of EDU 010 Field Experience One (grade of “B” or better)

4. Successful completion of EDU 100 Introduction to Education (grade of “B” or better)

5. Proficiency in speaking and listening (grade of “C” or better in COM 101 or COM 232)

6. Completion of EDU 200 Technology in Education (grade of “B” or better)

7. Completion of EDU 202 Psychology of Learning (grade of “B” or better)

8. Successful Completion of the Admission to the School of Education Portfolio

School of Arts & Sciences Faculty (SAS)

Mary Gross, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
920.923.7664
mgross@marianuniversity.edu

School of Education Faculty (SoE)

Kathy McCord, M.S.
Instructor
920.923.7637
kmccord@marianuniversity.edu

Polly Manske, M.S.
Assistant Professor
920.923.7151
pkmanske52@marianuniversity.edu

Aida Michlowski, Ph.D.
Professor
920.923.8749
amichlowski@marianuniversity.edu

Sr. Cyndi Nienhaus, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
920.923.6712
canienhaus06@marianuniversity.edu

Kristi Reitz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
920.923.7177
klreitz64@marianuniversity.edu

Sr. Catherine Stewart, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
920.923.8099
cmstewart97@marianuniversity.edu

Sue Stoddart, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
920.923.7170
sstoddart@marianuniversity.edu

Robert Wagner, M.E.
Instructor
920.923.8152
bwagner@marianuniversity.edu

As part of the broad field social studies education program, you’ll be met with a balance of theory and practice in the areas of the social sciences, history, government, economics, geography, international studies and sociology. Through an extensive knowledge in these areas, you will be prepared to teach history and other social studies courses, especially following ample experiences at the front of the classroom.

Apply Now

For more information, please contact:

Office of Admission
920.923.7650
admission@marianuniversity.edu

Mary Gross, Ph.D.
920.923.7664
mgross@marianuniversity.edu

Dean, School of Education
Dr. Kelly Chaney
1-800-262-7426 ext. 8100
kachaney01@marianuniversity.edu

Department Chairperson
Dr. Kristi Reitz
1-800-262-7426 ext. 7177
klreitz64@marianuniversity.edu

Support Staff
Ms. Leah Schraeder, Support Specialist III
1-800-262-7426 ext. 8128 or 920-923-8128
laschraeder27@marianuniversity.edu