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Nursing Course Descriptions

General Education Program 46-49 University Requirements: 

Pre-Nursing Requirements:

BIO 100    Life Systems

3 credits

An introductory biology course for non-majors. The relationship between structure and function is emphasized at the cellular and organismic levels. A survey of taxonomy and classification, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology, and ecology is provided. (May be taken as "lecture only" or concurrently with BIO 150).

BIO 205   Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology

5 credits

Prerequisites: BIO 100 or 101 or 102; CHE 101 or 102 or 103

 

A systemic structure/function approach to the study of the human body that provides the background required for further study in applied physiology. Anatomy and physiology of integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, reproductive, respiratory, endocrine, and urinary systems are studied. The laboratory parallels and reinforces lecture concepts through the use of models, histological studies, physiological exercises, and dissection of biological samples.

BIO 210   Microbiology

3 credits

Prerequisites: BIO 100 or 102; CHE 101 or 103 or 104

 

A comprehensive course in which students learn the structural characteristics and biological activities of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, and helminths. Particular emphasis is placed on those organisms that cause disease in humans and on the nature of the immune response in humans. A strong background in biology and understanding of Krebs cycle, transcription, and translation is required. ( Students may not take both BIO 210 and BIO 311 for credit.)

CHE 103   General, Organic, and Biochemistry

5 credits

Prerequisites:   High school chemistry or CHE 001; MAT 001 or appropriate math placement test score

An introductory course for non-science majors. This lecture and laboratory course provides a basic knowledge of chemistry and its application to everyday life, with special focus on biological and medical applications.

COM 302   Intercultural Communication

3 credits

 

This course develops intercultural communication competence through an exploration of cultures. Using a broad definition of culture, which includes norms, values, beliefs, art, music, and literature, students examine the world as a place of dynamic change and cultural interaction, increasing their need for intercultural sensitivity. Through both theory and personal experience, students examine how the various components of communication are affected by and interface with the intercultural experience. Service-learning is a component of this course.

PHI 220   Bioethics

3 credits

Prerequisite: PHI 130   or 132

 

A course designed specifically for those concerned with ethical problems facing medical professionals and generally for anyone with an interest in the relation of ethics to biomedical issues. The course examines the nature of ethics and morality, the variety of ethical theories and normative ethical principles, and the practice of applying such concepts to specific cases and issues within the biomedical sciences. Topics include issues in the professional-patient relationship, termination of life, reproductive rights and technologies, and allocation and public policy.

PSY 105   Human Development

3 credits

 

This course surveys the changes that occur during the entire lifespan as people develop, including physical, motor, cognitive, moral, and social-emotional. Developmental theory and research data are critically considered. Application of existing knowledge about the variables that affect the course of development is emphasized.

SWK 210   Statistical Techniques for Research Data Analysis

3 credits

Prerequisite:Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 001 with a grade of C or higher

 

An interdisciplinary introduction to the basic principles of data analysis with an emphasis on application. Students apply these principles to data analysis in their respective areas of study. The applied focus is on the computerized application of summary statistics, one-/two-/multi-sample tests, linear models, association tests, randomness/normality tests, and probability distributions, as used across a variety of community and organizational settings. Other techniques may be added as appropriate for specific disciplines.

Nursing Credits:

NRS 200   Health Promotion, Wellness, and Safety Across the Lifespan

6 credits

Prerequisites: BIO 205; BIO 210; CHE 103; ENG 106; PSY 105; SWK 210

Prerequisite or corequisite: NRS 215

Corequisite: NRS 230

(Admission to the major required)

This course introduces foundational concepts and skills in the form of nursing health promotion strategies to facilitate individual and group wellness and safety across the lifespan. The development of disease states and methods to prevent or decrease risk factors are discussed. Emphasis is on the role of the professional nurse in planning and implementing nursing care, effective teaching, and interventional behaviors for individuals and families. Emphasis is placed on normal growth and developmental changes across the lifespan addressing health promotion, wellness, and safety concerns in the care of patients.

NRS 215   Introduction to Pharmacology

2 credits

This course focuses on acquiring and expanding knowledge, skills, and attitudes of basic concepts and principles in pharmacology and drug classifications to include metabolism, action, use, adverse effects, and treatment implications. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of the health care professional in the legal, ethical, safe, and effective medication administration.

NRS 230   Health Assessment

4 credits

Prerequisites: BIO 205; BIO 210; CHE 103; ENG 106; PSY 105; SWK 210

Prerequisite or corequisite: NRS 215

Corequisite: NRS 200

(Admission to the major required)

This course provides the knowledge of health history taking, physical assessment, and documentation. Students acquire needed skills to conduct a comprehensive health assessment including the physical, psychological, social, functional, and environmental aspects of health. Integrated in this is the collection and analysis of data that are essential in planning safe and effective care. Effective communication, assessment, and documentation are practiced in the laboratory setting. Students become familiar with the techniques of physical assessment consisting of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation. Emphasis is placed on health assessment as a systematic and organized examination that provides accurate data from which to form valid nursing diagnoses and plans of care.

NRS 300   Patient Centered Care Across the Lifespan I

6 credits

Prerequisites: NRS 200; 215; 230

This course focuses on the conceptual analysis of health problems, diagnoses, and interventions related to the acquisition and expansion of knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in previous courses related to holistic care of individuals and families affected by selected disorders across the life continuum.

NRS 315   Psychosocial Integrity Across the Lifespan

2 credits

Prerequisites: NRS 200; 215; 230

This course focuses on the growth of typical and adaptive psychosocial health behaviors across the lifespan and the most common mental health problems associated with children, adolescents, adults, and older adults exploring the mental and emotional difficulties and developmental needs that everyone faces. Specific attention is given to therapeutic communication techniques dealing with individuals and families across the lifespan.

NRS 325   Health Care Systems

2 credits

This course explores the structure of health care policy, organization of health care delivery systems, health care financing, and their inter-relationships. Emphasis is placed on nursing's and other selected health professionals' role impact on the health care environment.

NRS 335   Research in Health Care

3 credits

Prerequisite: NRS 200

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the use of scientific research as a basis for understanding and improving clinical practice. Topics include differentiation between various forms of written communication, utilizing former research to support a position and/or develop new research proposals, organizing and writing research papers, and producing visual aids for oral presentations. Emphasis is on the critical review of research studies and their applications for evidenced-based clinical practice. This is a writing intensive course.

NRS 350   Patient Centered Care Across the Lifespan II

6 credits

Prerequisite: NRS 300

This course focuses on the conceptual analysis of health problems, diagnoses, and interventions related to the acquisition and expansion of knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in previous courses related to holistic care of individuals and families affected by selected disorders across the life continuum.

NRS 365   Health Care Informatics

2 credits

This course focuses on core concepts, skills, and tools that define the health care informatics field, including the examination of health information technologies to promote safety, improve quality, and foster consumer centered care and efficiency.

NRS 400   Patient Centered Care Across the Lifespan III

6 credits

Prerequisite: NRS 350

This course focuses on the conceptual analysis of health problems, diagnoses, and interventions related to the acquisition and expansion of knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in previous courses related to holistic care of individuals and families affected by selected disorders across the life continuum.

NRS 415   Leadership and Health Care Professionals

3 credits

Prerequisite: SWK 422

This course differentiates leadership and followership and emphasizes major behavior patterns that effective leaders use to influence followers, including various leadership models. Topics include what effective leaders really do and how leaders can diagnose and modify situations to make their leadership a more positive and productive endeavor within the health care field.

NRS 425   Trends and Issues in Health Care

2 credits

Prerequisite or corequisite: NRS 400

This course explores the impact of numerous professional and societal forces on health care policy and practice.  Topics include an analysis of current studies, health care policy, and position statements; political, environmental, and cultural issues; and changing nursing roles. The study of these issues examines the impact on health care delivery systems in society.

NRS 430   Public Health Nursing

5 credits

Prerequisites: COM 302, NRS 335, NRS 365, SWK 422

This course focuses on acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to population focused care. Concepts of population based health promotion and disease prevention are explored. Through the use of community needs assessments and National Health Care Objectives (Healthy People 2020), patient centered care is applied to aggregates established by geopolitical boundaries.

NRS 450   Patient Centered Care Across the Lifespan IV

4 credits

Prerequisite: NRS 400

This course focuses on the conceptual analysis of health problems, diagnoses, and interventions related to the acquisition and expansion of knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in previous courses related to holistic care of individuals and families affected by critical illness disorders across the life continuum.

NRS 461   Concept Synthesis

1 credit

Corequisite: NRS 450

This course is a focused review of content pertinent to the NCLEX-RN® test plan based on group performance on a standardized comprehensive predictor exam. Emphasis is placed on student progress on the individualized focused review.

NRS 470   Senior Capstone

4 credits

Corequisite: NRS 450

 

This course focuses on integration and application of the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained throughout the curriculum. Emphasis is on clinical competency and demonstration of the graduate learning outcomes in an area of student interest.

SWK 422   Law and the Helping Professions

3 credits

(Also PSY 422)

 

This course examines the Wisconsin Statutes and Administrative Codes that guide helping professionals in their practice with clientele. Attention is directed toward assisting the helping professional recognize the legal duties and responsibilities within their professional lives. Emphasis is placed on the children's code, mental health/developmental disabilities, protective services, care records, mandatory reporting, abuse, domestic violence, and professional conduct.

Health Care Focused Electives: 

ATH 201   Introduction to Expressive and Therapeutic Arts

3 credits

Through a variety of readings, research, art activities, discussion, and creative journaling, students experience the fundamental processes of the expressive and therapeutic arts. An emphasis on self-study aids students in exploring personal goals, expectations, and career choices regarding application of these processes to fields of art, health care, social services, elder care, education, and business.

ATH 203   Basic Therapeutic Skills

3 credits

Prerequisite: ATH 201

This course explores various theories and experiential techniques used in the therapeutic environment.  Consideration is given to the appropriate application of techniques and materials specific to the expressive and therapeutic arts. The professional and ethical requirements of the client-therapist relationship are also examined.

BIO 301   Genetics and Lab

4 credits

Prerequisite: BIO 100 or 102; CHE 201

 

An in-depth study of classical and molecular genetics. Students see how the science of genetics has emerged from its infancy to present-day molecular aspects of inheritance, including recombinant DNA technology. Both lecture and laboratory stress cytological, biochemical, and evolutionary aspects of gene action.

ECE 301   Teaching Young Children with Special Needs

3 credits

Prerequisite: EDU 213

 

This course gives early childhood educators the expertise needed to teach young children with special educational needs who are included in regular early childhood settings. It focuses on identifying the needs of those children and adapting early childhood curriculum and methodology in response to an extended range of individual differences.

EDU 213   Introduction to Exceptional Education

3 credits

This   course   addresses the characteristics of exceptional children and introduces successful inclusive teaching practices. This course covers topics such as disability conditions, gifted and talented, legislation, collaboration, planning, assessment, response to intervention, and diversity.

FOS 105   Survey of Forensic Sciences

1 credit

(Also CRJ 105)

 

Lecture/seminar course that provides students with a general introduction to the application of scientific knowledge to the purposes of the law. It familiarizes students with some areas of science that are involved in the court process, particularly in criminal trials, and the role of the forensic criminalist in criminal procedure. This course surveys forensic criminalistics and prepare students for more in-depth classes in criminalistics and forensic science.

GRB 350/650  Palliative and Hospice Care: History, Theory, and Practice

3 credits

 

This course explores the history, theory, and practice of both hospice and palliative care. Topics include palliative approach to medicine (as contrasted with the curative approach); medical aspects of dying; terminal disease trajectories; active dying; and the dying process. Multidimensional aspects of pain are discussed in theoretical and practical perspectives. The impact of end-stage terminal illness on caretakers and family members is addressed, as well as strategies for self-care for caregivers. Content includes practical strategies for assisting families in communicating with health care providers; ethical decision-making at the end of life; and an examination of hospice and palliative care unit staffing needs and the role of volunteers.

GRB 400/700   Death in the Lives of Children and Teenagers

3 credits

 

This course provides an in-depth examination of the attitudes and responses of children and adolescents to death, loss, and grief, and how they relate to human developmental stages. Special emphasis is given to working with families and caregivers of terminally-ill children and teenagers; facilitating communication between health care providers and families of terminally-ill children; strategies for helping children and teens in the midst of family illness and impending death of an adult loved one; and models of bereavement programs for children and teens.

HCA 201   Introduction to Health Care Administration

3 credits

Students are introduced to the use of concepts, theory, and approach as they relate to professional practice in the health care system. Students are exposed to experience with the health care system from a customer perspective. A broad overview of the levels of care, the care continuum, and the regulations governing care delivery is provided. Issues of individual behaviors, health status indicators, and government responsibilities are also discussed. Key issues in health policy are presented.

NUR 220   Introduction to Medical Terminology

2 credits

(Also BIO 220)

This course provides information about common medical terms, definition, and usage. The systems model is used to organize content and make it more meaningful for the development of medical vocabulary.

PHI 306   Ethics of Gender, Race, and Class

3 credits

Prerequisite: PHI 130 or 132

 

This course focuses on the meaning and significance of social justice through a critical examination of concepts and issues pertaining specifically to gender, race, and class, as well as to difference in general. Considerable attention is given to identifying and understanding the values, beliefs, and assumptions that form the basis of prejudice, inequality, privilege, and oppression. Insights from a variety of perspectives and disciplines are integrated with philosophical analysis, much of which involves ethical reasoning and theory application.

PSY 211   Abnormal Psychology

3 credits

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 105

This course explores the major types of psychopathology including anxiety disorders, personality disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, organic brain disorders, substance-related disorders, somatoform disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders, sleeping disorders, mental retardation, adjustment disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders, impulse control disorders and delirium, dementia, and amnestic disorders. Emphasis is given to the issues surrounding classification, etiology, and treatment.

PSY 331   Neuroscience

3 credits

Prerequisites: PSY 101 or 105; BIO 100 or 101

An examination of the data and theories that help us to understand the connections between our bodies and our actions. The anatomical, physiological, and chemical correlates of a wide range of human activities, from simple reflexes to complex decision-making and thinking, is examined. Brain damage and recovery from it are considered.

SPA 109   Spanish for Medical Personnel I

3 credits

This is a practical course for professionals in the field of health care. Students develop conversational and written skills necessary in health care settings that serve the Hispanic population. Topics interviewing techniques, explaining medical conditions and preventive health care options, explaining procedures, giving advice, and comforting patients. This course may be audited.

SPA 110   Spanish for Medical Personnel II

3 credits

Prerequisite: SPA 101 or 109

 

This course builds on the grammar concepts, practical vocabulary, and linguistic skills developed in that SPA 109. It is a practical course for professionals in health care. Students continue to develop conversational and written skills necessary for basic communication in settings that serve the Hispanic population. Topics include interviewing techniques, explaining medical conditions and preventive health care options, explaining procedures, giving advice, and comforting patients.


96 Percent

Fun Fact

96% of Marian students participate in educationally driven internships and research in their majors, giving them experience that can be applied after graduation.

Campus Info

Marian University - Main Campus
45 S. National Ave.
Fond du Lac, WI 54935-4699

CALL: 1-800-2-MARIAN (1-800-262-7426)
EMAIL: admission@marianuniversity.edu  

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