What Are You Inspired to Do?

Elementary-Middle Education Course Descriptions

Education requirements

18 credits:

ART 103   Art Foundation for Educators
3 credits
A basic course developing an art foundation for educators. The art experiences will address necessary objectives for the development of cogent teaching practice including sensory and perceptual awareness, recognition and use of fundamental art concepts, implementation of the creative process, formation or enrichment of art techniques and skills and encouragement for a more profound respect and recognition of the visual arts. This is a required art course for all early childhood–elementary and elementary–middle education majors, and a recommended art core course for other education majors with the exception of art education.

HIS 101   World Civilizations I
3 credits
A survey of world civilizations from human origins to the 16th century. Exploration of the cultural, political, and economic development of humankind in a global context.

MAT 150   Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I
3 credits
Prerequisite: Appropriate math placement test score or grade of C or higher in MAT 001 or MAT 002
A course designed to examine and develop the conceptual foundation upon which elementary mathematics is built. Quantitative thinking skills are developed through applications and problem solving situations. Topics include problem-solving, sets, functions, logic, numeration systems, number theory, and basic arithmetic operations.

MAT 151   Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II
3 credits
Prerequisite:  MAT 150 with a grade of C or higher
A course designed to examine and develop the conceptual foundation upon which elementary mathematics is built. Quantitative thinking skills are developed through applications and problem-solving situations. Topics include probability, statistics, and geometry.

POS 205   American Government
3 credits
An introductory course that studies the nature and purpose of national, state, and local government, the Constitution, and the institutions and pressures of American society.

PSY 105   Human Development
3 credits
A survey of the changes that occur during the entire lifespan as people develop: physical, motor, cognitive, moral, and social–emotional. Developmental theory and research data are critically considered. Application of existing knowledge about the variables that affect the course of development is emphasized.

3 credits from the following:

HIS 102   World Civilizations II
3 credits
A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political, and economic development of humankind in a global context.

HIS 111   History of the United States to 1877
3 credits
A survey course in which the cultural, political, and economic events that have shaped American history from the precontact period to 1877 will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics, including the evolution of race and gender relations, independence, the emergence of popular democracy, the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the impact of industrialism and urbanization upon American life.

HIS 112   History of the United States from 1877
3 credits
A survey course in which the cultural, political, and economic events that have shaped American history from 1877 to the present will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics, including the continuing development of race and gender relations, the impact of industrialism, the world wars and the Cold War upon American life.

Elementary-middle education courses

43 credits:

EDU 010   Field Experience One
½ credit
(Admission to Field Experience)
Corequisite: EDU 200, EDU 202
An initial field-based experience focused primarily on observation. Seminars provide the student opportunities to: 1) reflect on observations and classroom experiences, 2) to be introduced to lesson planning, issues in classroom management, and conflict resolution, 3) to be introduced to the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of these standards for professional goal setting, 4) develop a portfolio for the admission to the School of Education.

EDU 020   Field Experience Two
½ credit
Prerequisite: EDU 010
A supervised field-based experience in which studentsbegin to apply theory and teaching strategies learnedin education courses to initial teaching experiences.Seminars provide supplemental opportunities for thestudent to link theory to practice, to continue thedevelopment and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting and continue the development of lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflictresolution.

EDU 030   Field Experience Three
½ credit
Prerequisite: EDU 020
Prerequisite or corequisite: EDU 213
A supervised field-based experience in which content and pedagogies from advanced methods courses is applied to teaching experiences. Seminars provide students an opportunity to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

EDU 040   Field Experience Four
½ credit
Prerequisite: EDU 030
A supervised field-based experience which places greater emphasis on the integration of content and pedagogies. Seminars provide the student an opportunity to reflect and dialogue on the multiple facets of the teaching-learning situation, to continue the development and understanding of the InTASK Teacher Standards and the use of standards for goal setting, lesson planning, issues in conflict management, and conflict resolution.

EDU 100   Introduction to Education
1 credit
Prerequisite or corequisite: EDU 010
The course is provides an orientation to teaching as a profession and an overview of the entrance requirements, conceptual framework, knowledge base, standards and competencies of the Marian University Teacher Education Program . Students will cover the requirements for teacher licensure, professional issues, and an overview of the mission statement, conceptual framework, and requirements of the teacher education program. Students will explore the foundation of education in the United States; philosophies associated with teaching, emerging models of teaching; and issues and trends affecting education in a diversified, technological and global world. The course will also lay the groundwork for students to develop their electronic portfolio requirement.

EDU 200   Technology in Education
3 credits
Corequisite: EDU 010, EDU 202
(For education majors only)
The course that examines the role technology in the classroom. This course is designed to emphasize the use of Web 2.0, Social Media, other technologies, and learning theories and educational research in the school setting. Students will be introduced to applications that may be used in the PK-12 educational settings. Students will also look at various ways to integrate the WI State Teacher Standards, Common Core Standards, and the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) into the curriculum.

EDU 202   Psychology of Learning
3 credits
Corequisite: EDU 010, EDU 200
This course will focus on the educational implications of psychological principles and theories of child and adolescent development derived from research. The application of theories and principles will emphasize components of the teaching–learning situation.

EDU 210   Classroom Management
2 credits
Prerequisite: EDU 010
This course focuses on effective classroom management in grades pre-K-12, with a holistic approach utilized to enhance research, develop hands-on activities, and to develop ideas about what effective classroom management is. The course stresses practical approaches and principles which may be applied in the classroom setting. Students will study different classroom management theories and techniques and will develop ways to build upon and refine their own personal model of effective classroom management using the tools and information provided by the course.

EDU 213   Introduction to Exceptional Education
3 credits
This course addresses the characteristics of exceptional children and introduces successful inclusive teaching practices. This course will cover topics such as disability conditions, gifted and talented, legislation, collaboration, planning, assessment, response to intervention, and diversity.

EDU 301   Intercultural Studies for Educators
3 credits
Prerequisite: EDU 202
A critical examination of factors that impact student learning, i.e.: sexual orientation, gender, religion, socioeconomics, language, and age. The Native American culture is studied. Particular attention is given to critical race theory, educational equity and critical social justice theory as foundational to intercultural studies for educators. Students are expected to develop relationships with people from various cultural backgrounds, and they are expected to evaluate and assess forces of discrimination in schools today. This course fulfills the requirements put forth under PI 34.15(c).

EDU 412   Educational Measurement and Assessment
3 credits
A critical appraisal of formal and informal teacher-directed evaluation ranging from standardized tests to authentic assessment. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation process and interpretation of test results.

EME 206   Health and Physical Education Curriculum and Methods
2 credits
A course designed to help the student gain an understanding of health and physical education curriculum and instruction at the elementary school level. It provides an overview of planning, organization, management, and assessment of developmentally appropriate content and methodology. Laboratory experiences will provide the student practice in instructional methods and techniques.

EME 303   Primary Reading: Teaching and Assessment
3 credits
Reading is a complex process that is best developed through both holistic and systematic methods. This course is intended to provide an overview of early reading and writing, instructional strategies in word recognition, including phonemic awareness and phonics, vocabulary development, and comprehension. It was designed to encompass both the theoretical and practical aspects of learning how to teach and assess reading in pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and primary grade classrooms.

EME 304   Intermediate Reading: Teaching and Assessment
3 credits
Prerequisite: EME 303
This course is designed for teachers of intermediate or early adolescent students. Emphasis will be placed on a developmental approach to teaching reading which uses a balanced approach to meeting the needs of the students. Strategies for teaching fluency, vocabulary and word study, and comprehension will be studied to enable learners to become independent and competent readers. The reading/writing connection will be expanded upon. Assessment and evaluation will be taught as a means to inform instruction. 

EME 306   Music Curriculum and Methods
2 credits
Prerequisite: MUS 101 or MUS 200 or MUS 202 or MUS 203 or MUS 205 with a grade of C or better
A course to prepare early childhood and elementary–middle education majors to teach music in the classroom through study of the musical needs of the child: singing, moving, playing classroom instruments, listening, and creating.

EME 311   Art Curriculum and Methods in Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle Schools
2 credits
Prerequisite: ART 103 with a grade of C or better
A course that provides students with an opportunity to apply experiences gained in ART 103 and to apply learning theories of art education to the aesthetic dimension of education. Education majors gain insight into the importance of art education, into past and present art education perspectives and into the implementation of quality art lessons. These insights, along with in-class practice, develop competence in art instruction at early childhood, elementary, and middle-school levels.

EME 312   Teaching Language Arts
4 credits
Students study the development of written and oral language for children from birth through early adolescence. Students explore the socio-cultural, practical, and political aspects of language arts instruction including the reciprocal nature of reading and writing.  Topics include oral and written language development, methods of teaching and assessing writing, grammar instruction, and the role of children’s literature within language arts instruction.

EME 316   Mathematics Curriculum and Methods
3 credits
Prerequisite: MAT 150, MAT 151 with a grade of C or better
A course that provides students with experiences using methodologies recommended for the effective teaching of mathematics. Students evaluate mathematics curricula and supplementary materials using specific assessment tools. Students review mathematics theory and content necessary for teaching early childhood, elementary, and middle school levels.

EME 322   Social Studies Curriculum and Methods
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101; HIS 102 or HIS 111 or HIS 112; and POS 205 with a grade of C or better
A course that explores the disciplines that comprise the social studies core and also stresses the importance of addressing environmental issues. Students study a variety of methodologies and materials and have opportunities to teach social studies lessons, and discuss value clarification processes, questioning techniques, and current issues and social studies education.

EME 332   Science Curriculum and Methods
3 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 104 or BIO 100 and BIO 150; and PHS 102 or PHS 108 or PHS 110 or PHS 201 or CHE 101 with a grade of C or better
This course gives students opportunities to peer-teach science lessons using inquiry and process-oriented methodologies. They evaluate science curricula and materials using specific criteria, and review physical, biological and earth science content necessary for teaching for the early childhood, elementary, and middle school grades.

12 credits:

EME 430   Clinical Practice and Seminar – Elementary – Grades 1-8
1-12 credits
A supervised teaching experience at the elementary/middle school level that provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management.

EME 450   Clinical Practice and Seminar – Minor
3-6 credits
A supervised teaching experience in an academic content area at the middle level that provides an opportunity for practical application of educational theory and research. The seminar is designed for students to reflect upon and analyze teaching experiences and discuss relevant issues such as ethics, communication and classroom management.

Language arts minor

15 credits

ENG 112   Introduction to Literary Genres
1-3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 105 or ENG 230
A genre-based study of short stories, drama, and poetry; the course focuses on applying tools of literary analysis to the interpretation of specific works in order to increase insight and pleasure. A wide variety of works is read, representing a diversity of cultures, contexts, and perspectives. Course objectives also include developing critical reading, thinking, and writing skills, and exploring the values-laden nature of literature.

ENG 212   American Literature II
3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 105 or ENG 230
A continuation of ENG 211, tracing the evolution of American literature from the Civil War to early Postmodernism in the contexts of the social and intellectual forces that shaped it, including the impact of minority writers. In lectures and discussions, students consider critical approaches to the rise of realism, naturalism, modernism, and the beginnings of postmodernism in American letters.

ENG 301   Creative Writing
3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 105 or ENG 230
An introduction to the techniques of writing poetry, fiction, and drama. The course is taught as a workshop, with repeated presentation and discussion of works in progress. (Repeatable for credit).

ENG 302   Shakespeare
3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 105 or ENG 230
A survey of Shakespeare’s major plays. While the emphasis is on close study of the individual works, students also consider Shakespeare’s artistic development and the plays’ historical contexts.

ENG 375   Advanced Study of Language, Grammar, and Rhetoric
3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 106
Students become more aware of principles and issues in grammar, linguistics, and rhetoric, particularly as they unfold historically, and apply this enhanced awareness to the development of their own writing. The course examines the stylistic elements of writing aimed at different discourse communities, including academic and business audiences, with emphasis on developing adaptability, expressiveness, and polish in students’ own writing.

3 credits from the following:

ENG 220   World Literature I
3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 105 or ENG 230
A study of major writers of Europe, Africa, Asia, and the New World, with emphasis on writers of international stature and influence. The course offers students a broad perspective on literary history from classical times to the 17th century. A chronological survey of significant work leads to discussion of problems in the historical examination of literature: the definition of movements, the relationships between society and literature, and the evolution of literary genres.

ENG 221   World Literature II
3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 105 or ENG 230
A study of major writers of Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the United States, with emphasis on writers of international stature and influence. The course offers students a broad perspective on literary history since the 17th century. A chronological survey of significant work leads to discussion of problems in the historical examination of literature: the definition of movements (such as neoclassicism, romanticism, realism), the relationships between society and literature, and the evolution of literary genres.

ENG 225   Mythology
3 credits
Prerequisite: ENG 105 or ENG 230
A study of important myths and legends from a variety of times and places, with emphasis on writers and works that have influences Western thought, arts, and culture. Using methods of formal and structural analysis, students will study works of literature, such as epics, plays, and poetry that employ mythological allusions and deal with universal symbols and themes.

Environmental studies minor

7 credits:

BIO 104   Environmental Science and Lab
4 credits
A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations, and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

BIO 315   Ecology
3 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A lecture course involving study of populations, communities, and individual organisms in relation to their environment. Abiotic and biotic factors, chemical cycles, population and community ecology, and succession are studied in depth. Interaction of organisms with physical and chemical components of the environment is stressed. Use of statistical methods in ecology is covered.

1-2 credits from the following:

BIO 304   Field Study
1-2 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 104 or BIO 315
Individual study arranged between the student and the department chair to observe and evaluate some phase of environmental science in nature or industry or through a civil or county department. The student keeps a daily log, collects data, and does extensive reading for a written report and oral presentation for a seminar.

BIO 425   Biology Senior Research I
1 credit
Prerequisite: BIO 300
The first of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty.  Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest.  In this course the student will refine research methods and experimental design, including data collection, and complete initial sections of the final written report.

BIO 426   Biology Senior Research II
1 credit
Prerequisite: BIO 425
The second of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty.  Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest.  In this course the student will collect and analyze data, finish  and submit  a written report, and do a public presentation of his or her research.

4-8 credits from the following:

BIO 100   Life Systems
3 credits
An introductory biology course for non-majors. The relationship between structure and function is emphasized at the cellular and organismic levels. A survey of taxonomy and classification, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology, and ecology is provided. (May be taken as “lecture only” or concurrently with BIO 150).

BIO 150   Life Systems Laboratory
1 credit
Laboratory to accompany BIO 100.
Topics correspond to lecture material, including taxonomy, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology, and ecology. Dissection of a fetal pig is required. Laboratory experiences strongly enhance and support material in BIO 100 and concurrent registration is recommended.

BIO 101   Biological Principles I
4 credits
A lecture–laboratory course for science majors stressing the nature of science and scientific methodology. Basic ecological concepts and human impact on the environment are studied. The chemistry of life, the cellular basis of life, genetics, energy relationships, and metabolism are presented. Both the classical aspects and the areas of recent research are included.

BIO 102   Biological Principles II
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 101
A continuation of BIO 101. Major topics covered include plant and animal biology. Structural and functional relationships are stressed. Major structures, adaptations, and evolution of Monera, Protista, and Animal kingdoms are surveyed. Current areas of research are included. Dissection of representative organisms including the fetal pig is required.

7-12 credits from the following:

BIO 114   Environmental Stewardship
4 credits
This course is a service-learning intensive biology course where students learn about environmental stewardship through participation in the maintenance and restoration of local ecosystems, for example, stream monitoring and removal of invasive species.  Through hands-on projects and selections of readings, the student will develop an understanding and appreciation for environmental stewardship. The course fulfills the one-credit laboratory requirement under general education. The course will be a hybrid course where much of the content will be delivered in an online format with one-day-a-week meetings to participate in field trips and stewardship projects. Due to the service learning and environmental aspects of the course, students must be able and willing to perform light labor (on the level of gardening) and a moderate amount of hiking. Students will be required to provide their own transportation to nearby locations; carpooling and cost sharing will be encouraged under Marian University’s policy on approved drivers for field trips.

BIO 116   Wisconsin Natural Areas
3 credits
Wisconsin Natural Areasexplores wild and tame lands in “this place we call Wisconsin.” During the Pleistocene epoch, a continental glacier sculpted and modified the land, sans southwestern Wisconsin’s Driftless Area. This most recent Ice Age produced regional landscapes with contrasting ecoregions that underpin the state’s natural areas. Among the topics to be examined are ecological landscapes, Public Land Survey System, WDNR State Natural Areas Program, land ethics, ecosystem services, invasive species, natural areas restoration, and Wisconsin natural communities.

BIO 221   Fall Flora
1 credit
A study of the common flowering plant families, their identification, and their classification. Emphasis is placed on field study providing both scientific and aesthetic experiences. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

BIO 222   Spring Flora
1 credit
A study of the common flowering plant families, their identification, and their classification. Emphasis is placed on field study providing both scientific and aesthetic experiences. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

BIO 231   Botany
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
An extensive study of the plant kingdom and related organisms. Major topics include taxonomy, structure, morphology, development, physiology, reproduction, and evolution of plants. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

BIO 301   Genetics and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO102and CHE 201
An in-depth study of classical and molecular genetics. Students see how the science of genetics has emerged from its infancy to present-day molecular aspects of inheritance, including recombinant DNA technology. Both lecture and laboratory stress cytological, biochemical, and evolutionary aspects of gene action.

BIO 310   Invertebrate Zoology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A study of the biology and taxonomy of major invertebrate groups with special emphasis on structure-function relationships: their life histories, evolution, ecology, and economic importance. Laboratory sessions involve the observation and dissection of representative invertebrate organisms in order that a clear understanding of each taxonomic phylum may be attained.

BIO 311   Molecular and Physiological Microbiology
4 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102, CHE 201
An introduction to bacterial structure, metabolism, growth principles, genetics, and identification. Other topics covered include antibiotics, bacteriophage, and infectious diseases caused by bacteria. (Students may not take both BIO 210 and BIO 311 for credit.)

BIO 312   Developmental Biology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A study of progressive changes that occur within cells, tissues and organisms during their life span. Development at the molecular, biochemical, genetic, morphological, and physiological levels are examined through lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises.

BIO 322   Vertebrate Zoology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A study of the evolution and comparative structure and function of the organ systems in all major groups of the phylum chordata. Laboratory work requires dissection of lamprey, shark, mud puppy, and cat with frequent reference to other representative vertebrates, especially humans.

BIO 342   Ornithology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A survey of ornithology. Lectures cover the biology, evolution and ancestral relationships, migration, flight and flight-related structures and behavior. Behavior and identification of local birds is addressed in laboratory and on field trips.

BIO 365   Ecology Laboratory
1 credit
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 315
This course is designed to accompany BIO 315 and offer a more quantitative approach to the study of ecology. The student is introduced to various ecological field and laboratory methods, including statistical analysis of data. Populations, habitat, communities, and productivity are analyzed, reinforcing the lecture material in BIO 315. Scientific report writing is stressed.

PHS 108   Earth Science and Lab
4 credits
An introduction to the physical nature and processes of the earth, along with the chemical bases for them. Dynamic processes of landscape formation and change as shaped by the forces of plate tectonics, weather and ground and surface water will be studied. Planetary geology will be introduced. The laboratories will complement lectures with both indoor study and field trips to study local examples.

PHS 110   Introduction to Meteorology and Lab
4 credits
A course in the basics of meteorology in which students study the atmosphere and its physical processes, including large-scale climatological and local weather phenomena and their impact on society, and on other aspects of ecological systems. Measurement of such physical characteristics as temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity, and wind along with data collection and analysis are included in laboratory exercises. Mathematical problem-solving skills will be emphasized. Professional meteorology and climatology are examined. Unusual and dangerous weather conditions and their causes and effects are studied, and students are introduced to microclimatology.

Mathematics minor

16 credits:

MAT 201   Calculus I
5 credits
Prerequisite: Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 112 with a grade of C or higher
A first course in the calculus treating functions of one variable. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of polynomial and rational functions. A major emphasis of this course is the application of these concepts to problems arising out of industry, economics, business, and the sciences.

MAT 212   Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
3 credits
Prerequisite: Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 201 with a grade of C or higher
A survey course designed to acquaint the prospective mathematics student with topics and techniques common to the study of advanced mathematics such as algebra, analysis, geometry, and statistics. Major topics of the course include symbolic logic, methods of proof, set theory, relations, functions, and structure in mathematics. Examples will be drawn from various branches of mathematics to illustrate the topics presented.

MTE 288   Mathematics for Middle School Teachers I
3 credits
Prerequisite: MAT 151
A course designed for students who have declared a math for elementary/middle education minor. Course will focus on developing problem-solving strategies relative to topics in geometry and number theory.  Topics may include non-Euclidian geometries, tessellations, mappings, topology, equations, inequalities, and algebraic proofs. 

MTE 289   Mathematics for Middle School Teachers II
3 credits
Prerequisite: MAT 151
A course designed for students who have declared a math for elementary/middle education minor. Course will focus on developing problem-solving strategies relative to topics in probability and statistics and presenting those strategies. One objective of the course is to investigate topics including descriptive and inferential statistics, graphing techniques, single-stage and multiple stage experiments, and other topics at the instructor’s discretion. A second objective of the course will allow the student to develop teaching strategies relevant of the above topics as pertain to the elementary/middle grades.

MTE 375   Historical Topics in Mathematics
2 credits
Prerequisite: MAT 212
A course designed to acquaint the prospective teacher of secondary mathematics with a survey of the history of the discipline. Topics will include a development of mathematics as known to the Babylonian, Egyptian, Greek, Arabian, and Chinese civilizations. Included in this discussion is the development of numerals and place-value numeration systems, the axiomatic method, and analysis of various algorithms, both modern and historical. Other topics may be included at the discretion and interest of the course instructor. This course is required of all mathematics teaching majors and minors.

3 credits from the following:

TEC 212   Computer Programming I
3 credits
Programming in an Algebraic Programming Language, if-then-else, loops, arrays, concepts of machine language, algorithms for searching, sorting and equation-solving. (A college course in math is highly recommended before taking TEC 212.)

TEC 223   Visual Programming I
3 credits
An introductory programming course involving current, available visual programming techniques and languages. Course curriculum will be continually revised to reflect ongoing changes in the field.

TEC 280   Introduction to Programming and Data Structures
3 credits
This course will introduce fundamental concepts related to the creation of data structures and programming logic in modern information systems. This course will introduce the importance data organization in computer systems; the variety of possible structures used to represent data relationships, how data structures are stored in memory, and the link between the design of data structures and programming algorithms.

Science minor

25 credits:

BIO 104   Environmental Science and Lab
4 credits
A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations, and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

CHE 101   Principles of Chemistry I
4 credits
An introduction to the fundamental principles of Chemistry, including modern concepts of atomic and molecular theory, physical states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, equilibria, and reactions of inorganic compounds.

CHE 102   Principles of Chemistry II
4 credits
Prerequisite: CHE 101 or CHE 105
A second-semester general chemistry course that introduces the topics of equilibrium, kinetics, ionic equilibria of weak electrolytes, solubility product, coordination compounds, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and descriptive chemistry. Qualitative analysis is included in the laboratory portion of this course.

PHS 108   Earth Science and Lab
4 credits
An introduction to the physical nature and processes of the earth, along with the chemical bases for them. Dynamic processes of landscape formation and change as shaped by the forces of plate tectonics, weather and ground and surface water will be studied. Planetary geology will be introduced. The laboratories will complement lectures with both indoor study and field trips to study local examples.

PHS 110   Introduction to Meteorology and Lab
4 credits
A course in the basics of meteorology in which students study the atmosphere and its physical processes, including large-scale climatological and local weather phenomena and their impact on society, and on other aspects of ecological systems. Measurement of such physical characteristics as temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity, and wind along with data collection and analysis are included in laboratory exercises. Mathematical problem-solving skills will be emphasized. Professional meteorology and climatology are examined. Unusual and dangerous weather conditions and their causes and effects are studied, and students are introduced to microclimatology.

PHS 211   Elementary Physics
5 credits
Prerequisite: MAT 112 or MAT 114 with a grade of C or better, or appropriate math placement test score
A one-semester lecture and laboratory physics course. Topics addressed include the fundamentals of kinematics, dynamics, statics, oscillation, electromagnetism, and optics.

4 credits from the following:

BIO 102   Biological Principles II
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 101
A continuation of BIO 101. Major topics covered include plant and animal biology. Structural and functional relationships are stressed. Major structures, adaptations, and evolution of Monera, Protista, and Animal kingdoms are surveyed. Current areas of research are included. Dissection of representative organisms including the fetal pig is required.

BIO 100   Life Systems
3 credits
An introductory biology course for non-majors. The relationship between structure and function is emphasized at the cellular and organismic levels. A survey of taxonomy and classification, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology, and ecology is provided. (May be taken as “lecture only” or concurrently with BIO 150).

BIO 150   Life Systems Laboratory
1 credit
Laboratory to accompany BIO 100.
Topics correspond to lecture material, including taxonomy, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology, and ecology. Dissection of a fetal pig is required. Laboratory experiences strongly enhance and support material in BIO 100 and concurrent registration is recommended.

Social studies minor

15 credits:

GEO 201   World Regional Geography
3 credits
A cultural, political, economic, and physical survey of the realms and regions of the world. Special attention will be given to human spatial interaction in a global context.

HIS 102   World Civilizations II
3 credits
A survey of world civilizations from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of the cultural, political, and economic development of humankind in a global context.

HIS 111   History of the United States to 1877
3 credits
A survey course in which the cultural, political, and economic events that have shaped American history from the precontact period to 1877 will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics, including the evolution of race and gender relations, independence, the emergence of popular democracy, the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the impact of industrialism and urbanization upon American life.

HIS 112   History of the United States from 1877
3 credits
A survey course in which the cultural, political, and economic events that have shaped American history from 1877 to the present will be explored. The course will pursue several key topics, including the continuing development of race and gender relations, the impact of industrialism, the world wars and the Cold War upon American life.

HIS 214   History of Wisconsin
3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: HIS 111
A survey of the cultural, economic, political, and social history of Wisconsin from the days of exploration to the present. The class emphasizes independent research and discussion.

3 credits from the following:

HIS 205   History of Selected Minorities
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 102 or HIS 114
An introductory historical survey of selected American minorities, including Native Americans, African-Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, women, religious minorities, and other minority groups. The course focuses upon the consequences of the interplay of cultural, political, and economic processes relative to minority-majority relations and the American experience.

HIS 211   American Military History
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 102 or HIS 114
A study of the American military in war and peace and its relationship to American culture and society, including social, economic, technological, and political factors that influenced changes in the military and its activities from colonial times to the present.

HIS 301   Church History to the Reformation
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101
A study of the development of the church from apostolic times to the Reformation. Significant figures in the history of the church are studied with stress on the interaction of the church and the world.

HIS 302   Church History Since the Reformation
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 102
A study of church history from the Reformation to the present. The course focuses on the influence of the church on the world rather than on doctrinal matters.

HIS 342   Topics in Ancient History
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 114
Provides the student with an opportunity to explore topics in ancient history from a Western or non-Western social, political, and economic framework.

HIS 405   History of the Modern Middle East
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 102
A survey of events in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the current day.

HIS 408   History of American Foreign Policy
3 credits
Prerequisites: HIS 102, HIS 112
A survey of major foreign policy issues and the conduct of diplomacy from the end of the 18th century to the present. Emphasis is placed on 20th century involvement of major powers in international conflicts.

HIS 416   History and Culture of American Indians
3 credits
Prerequisites: HIS 111, HIS 112, SOC 100
A study of the history of American Indians from precontact times to the present. Special attention is given to issues surrounding the continuing effect of contact and discovery upon American Indians in a cultural, political and economic context.

HIS 423   History of Latin America
3 credits
Prerequisites: HIS 101, HIS 102
A survey of economic, political, religious, and social change ad continuity in Latin America from the pre-colonial period to the present day. Latin America is defined as including the Caribbean Islands, Mexico, Central America and South America.

HIS 426   History of Africa
3 credits
Prerequisites: HIS 101, HIS 102
A topical survey of the history of African peoples from human origins to the present. Subjects include regional historical developments, African social and political patterns, the impact of external contacts, imperialism and colonialism, nationalism and independence, and current issues in Africa.

HIS 431   History of Monsoon Asia
3 credits
Prerequisites: HIS 101, HIS 102
A survey of civilizations in monsoon Asia from prehistory to the present. Emphasis is placed on cultural, political, and social development of China, Japan and India, with some attention to Korea, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia.

3 credits from the following:

HIS 436   Controversies in American History
3 credits
Prerequisite(s): HIS 111 or HIS 112
A study of various controversies within American history from colonial times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

HIS 438   Controversies in World History
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 111 or HIS 112
A study of various controversies within world history from ancient times to the present. These will include major historiographical controversies.

HIS 490   Seminar in American History
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 111 or HIS 112
An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of American history in a seminar type format.  Topics are drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

HIS 492   Seminar in World History
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 102
An opportunity to study specific topics in the various fields of world history in a seminar type format.  Topics are drawn from the interests of the department faculty and students.

3 credits from the following:

ECO 201  Macroeconomics
3 credits
Prerequisite: MAT 100 or MAT 105 or MAT 111 or MAT 122 or MAT 130 or appropriate math placement test score
An introduction to the overall functioning of an economic system with a view toward understanding the factors underlying income, employment, and prices on the aggregate level. Topics include such monetary and fiscal policies as suggested by the relevant theories discussed.

PSY 202   Social Psychology
3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 101 or PSY 105
An investigation of the influences of social factors on individual behavior, the role of social cognition when people interact, interpersonal and group dynamics, and application of social–psychological research data to various situations.

PSY 211   Abnormal Psychology
3 credits
Prerequisite: PSY 101 or PSY 105
This course explores the major types of psychopathology to include anxiety disorders, personality disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, organic brain disorders, substance-related disorders, somatoform disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders, sleeping disorders, mental retardation, adjustment disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders, impulse control disorders and delirium, dementia and amnestic disorders. Emphasis is given to the issues surrounding classification, etiology, and treatment.

PSY 341   Cognitive Psychology
3 credits
This course examines the underlying basis for human skills in learning, perception, attention and memory, language, problem solving, and decision-making. The focus is on current knowledge about the processes, structures, and mechanisms that contribute to human cognition. Some application of this knowledge to fields such as law, education, and clinical psychology will be included.

Spanish minor

24 credits:

FLE 470   Foreign Language Curriculum and Methods (PK-12)
3 credits
This course provides students with opportunities to develop and practice skills related to linking theories about second language acquisition and teaching to classroom practice. The theoretical foundations of foreign language skill development, planning, assessment strategies, and an analysis of teaching of culture are the basis for classroom activities. Current developments of school foreign-language program models, the use of technology to support language teaching and career exploration, are also highlighted.

SPA 101   Elementary Spanish I
3 credits
An introduction to the fundamentals of comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. The course provides, at the same time, the cultural background of the Hispanic world.

SPA 102   Elementary Spanish II
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 101 or appropriate Spanish placement test score
A continuation of SPA 101. This course continues to develop the basic skills of comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish by providing live and meaningful situations with the cultural background of the Hispanic world.

SPA 201   Intermediate Spanish I
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 102 or appropriate Spanish placement test score
A continued development of competence in the intermediate language skills through intensified usage of grammar with practice in conversational role-playing, using topics of general and current interest of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPA 202   Intermediate Spanish II
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 201 or appropriate Spanish placement test score
A continuation of SPA 201, this course concludes intermediate Spanish grammar with special practice in reading, introducing short stories concerning topics of general and current interest of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPA 301   Latin American Civilizations
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or appropriate Spanish placement test score
An introduction to cultural diversity and historical legacies of peoples of Hispanic America. Through
the study of texts from multiple genres, the course addresses the evolution of social structures, the construction of gender, the role of indigenous peoples, economics, etc. Historical themes include pre-Colombian civilizations, exploration, conquest, colonialism, independence, and socio-economic revolutions.

SPA 401   Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or appropriate placement test score
Introduction to the study of advanced literature and literary analysis of the works of some principal writers of Spain and Latin America in the context of historical periods and their literary movements, past and present.

SPA 402   Hispanic Literature of Social Conscience
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or appropriate placement test score
Literary and socio-cultural analysis of a variety of works of literature in Spanish that examine issues such as human rights, construction of gender, cultural identity, social class, civil war, religion, displacement, land tenure, economic inequality, and political power.

3 credits from the following:

SPA 302   History and Culture of Spain
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or appropriate Spanish placement test score
An introduction to the cultural diversity and history of Spain. Through the study of texts from multiple genres, the course addresses the evolution of social structures, languages, religion, the economy, the arts, politics, etc. from the Middle Ages until the 20th century.

SPA 311   Advanced Spanish Grammar
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or appropriate Spanish placement test score
An intensive review of all major structures of the Spanish language with emphases on focused written and aural/oral practice as well as the clarification of words often mistranslated from English into Spanish.

SPA 312   Advanced Composition and Conversation in Spanish
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202 or appropriate Spanish placement test score
The principles of expository and creative writing in Spanish through the study of models and a guided exploration of the students’ own writing process. Students model their conversational gambits and writing skills on samples of five types of composition: description, narration, reporting, persuasion, and thesis development.

SPA 320   Hispanic Experience in the United States
3 credits
Exploration of the contemporary writings of Hispanic Americans that provide insight into the history, socio-political, and literary roots of cultural identity in the U.S. Texts are representative of various genres in Spanish and English and illuminate the diverse ethnic and cultural components of Hispanic communities in different regions of the U.S. Texts are in English. This course is taught in English. (This course may be applied toward the requirement of 12 credits of study of foreign language for the Bachelor of Arts degree.)

SPA 322   To Be a Woman in Latin America
3 credits
A literature course surveying the construction of gender in Latin America from pre-colonial times, through 300 years of colonization and into the 21st century. A variety of texts including novels, poetry, diaries, nonfiction essays and several videos will explore topics such as the myths of machismo and marianismo, the politics of women’s speaking and writing, women’s activisms for social justice, human rights, and to expand the literary canon. This course is taught in English. (This course may be applied toward the requirement of 12 credits of study of foreign language for the Bachelor of Arts degree.)

SPA 324   Truth and Memory in Latin America
3 credits
The advanced study of critical fictions and testimonial texts to explore how art as activism in Latin America challenges the literary canon and restores the people’s historical memory during periods of enforced forgetfulness. This course is taught in English. (This course may be applied toward the requirement of 12 credits of study of foreign language for the Bachelor of Arts degree.)

SPA 411   Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202
Study of representative works of Peninsular Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present. This course presents literary movements in a socio-historical context to foster greater understanding of currents of thought and literary style in each era.

SPA 412   Masterpieces of Spanish–American Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202 
Analysis of the major literary works of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present. Students study texts of all genres representing literary movements in a socio-historical context.

SPA 413   Twentieth Century Hispanic Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: SPA 202
Socio-historical and literary foundations of contemporary literature in Spain and Latin America. This course examines the unique aspects of socio-political reality as well as modernism, realism, and regionalism as the foundation for various post-modernist genres in Spanish.

1986

Did You Know?

Adult accelerated undergraduate programs were started in 1986, one of the first in the state. The first graduates were in May of 1987 (Source: Marian University Archives).

Campus Info

Marian University - Main Campus
45 S. National Ave.
Fond du Lac, WI 54935-4699

CALL: 1-800-2-MARIAN (1-800-262-7426)
EMAIL: admission@marianuniversity.edu  

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