Biology Course Descriptions

BIO 010 Biology Seminar I
0 credits
Research seminars, reviews of professional biology literature, and research proposals presented by biology majors, faculty members, and/or guest speakers. (“0” credit receives CR/NC grade.)

BIO 020 Biology Seminar II
0 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 010
Research preparation and training in seminar and guided research formats. Research and career seminars, reviews of professional biology literature, and research proposals are presented by Biology majors and faculty, with occasional guest speakers. (“0” credit receives CR/NC grade.)

BIO 100 Life Systems
3 credits
An introductory biology course for non-majors. The relationship between structure and function is emphasized at the cellular and organismic levels. A survey of taxonomy and classification, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology, and ecology is provided. (May be taken as “lecture only” or concurrently with BIO 150).

BIO 101 Biological Principles I
4 credits
(Required for Biology majors and minors)
A lecture–laboratory course for science majors stressing the nature of science and scientific methodology. Basic ecological concepts and human impact on the environment are studied. The chemistry of life, the cellular basis of life, genetics, energy relationships, and metabolism are presented. Both the classical aspects and the areas of recent research are included.

BIO 102 Biological Principles II
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 101
A continuation of BIO 101. Major topics covered include plant and animal biology. Structural and functional relationships are stressed. Major structures, adaptations, and evolution of Monera, Protista, and Animal kingdoms are surveyed. Current areas of research are included. Dissection of representative organisms including the fetal pig is required.

BIO 104 Environmental Science and Lab
4 credits
A study of the organization of ecosystems and human use of natural resources, including problems and opportunities generated by human interaction with the environment. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues and topics. Environmental case studies and current environmental literature are employed. Laboratory activities include field trips, simulations, and other activities designed to enhance lecture topics.

BIO 105 Biology in Society
4 credits
(This course does not satisfy prerequisite requirements for any other natural science courses.)
The course will use current events and scientific technologies, identified by the class, to illustrate the impacts of biological science in U.S. and global society. These topics will serve as vehicles to illuminate science philosophy, history, reasoning, and techniques and to emphasize the importance of science literacy to citizens in a technologically rich democracy. Several laboratory projects will be conducted and reported in different styles with different goals and hypothetical audiences (popular press, professional article, oral news report, platform presentation).

BIO 110 Prairie Ecosystems and Restoration – Fall
2 credits
This course is a service-learning intensive biology course where students learn about the ecology of prairies, the importance of prairie ecosystems, and techniques to preserve and restore prairies. The course will be a hybrid course where much of the content will be delivered in an on-line format with one-day-a-week meetings to participate in field trips and stewardship projects. Due to the service learning and environmental aspects of the course, students must be able and willing to perform light labor (on the level of gardening) and a moderate amount of hiking, and be able to attend an extended field trip once during the semester. The 4-credit laboratory science requirement under general education is fulfilled by taking this class and its complementary spring offering, BIO 112.

BIO 111 Ecology and the Environment
3 credits
(AGS students only)
This course is designed to help students understand the interrelationships among biological and physical components of human ecosystems, including human impacts on the environment. Major environmental problems and responses to them by business and society are explored. The complexity of environmental issues and the relationship of ecological principles to environmental problems and solutions are stressed. Case studies demonstrate both environmental disasters and successful or ethical approaches to problems on the part of business.

BIO 112 Prairie Ecosystems and Restoration – Spring
2 credits
This course is a service-learning intensive biology course where students learn about the ecology of prairies, the importance of prairie ecosystems, and techniques to preserve and restore prairies. The course will be a hybrid course where much of the content will be delivered in an on-line format with one-day-a-week meetings to participate in field trips and stewardship projects. Due to the service learning and environmental aspects of the course, students must be able and willing to perform light labor (on the level of gardening) and a moderate amount of hiking, and be able to attend an extended field trip once during the semester. The 4-credit laboratory science requirement under general education is fulfilled by taking this class and its complementary fall offering, BIO 110.

BIO 114 Environmental Stewardship
4 credits
This course is a service-learning intensive biology course where students learn about environmental stewardship through participation in the maintenance and restoration of local ecosystems, for example, stream monitoring and removal of invasive species. Through hands-on projects and selections of readings, the student will develop an understanding and appreciation for environmental stewardship. The course fulfills the one-credit laboratory requirement under general education. The course will be a hybrid course where much of the content will be delivered in an online format with one-day-a-week meetings to participate in field trips and stewardship projects. Due to the service learning and environmental aspects of the course, students must be able and willing to perform light labor (on the level of gardening) and a moderate amount of hiking. Students will be required to provide their own transportation to nearby locations; carpooling and cost sharing will be encouraged under Marian University’s policy on approved drivers for field trips.

BIO 116 Wisconsin Natural Areas
3 credits
Wisconsin Natural Areas explores wild and tame lands in “this place we call Wisconsin.” During the Pleistocene epoch, a continental glacier sculpted and modified the land, sans southwestern Wisconsin’s Driftless Area. This most recent Ice Age produced regional landscapes with contrasting ecoregions that underpin the state’s natural areas. Among the topics to be examined are ecological landscapes, Public Land Survey System, WDNR State Natural Areas Program, land ethics, ecosystem services, invasive species, natural areas restoration, and Wisconsin natural communities.

BIO 150 Life Systems Laboratory
1 credit
Laboratory to accompany BIO 100.
Topics correspond to lecture material, including taxonomy, cell biology, plant biology, human physiology, and ecology. Dissection of a fetal pig is required. Laboratory experiences strongly enhance and support material in BIO 100 and concurrent registration is recommended.

BIO 201 Anatomy and Physiology I
4 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102; CHE 101 or CHE 103 or CHE 104
An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of cellular structure and physiology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. A strong background in biology and basic knowledge of physiological systems is assumed. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 251 is recommended.

BIO 202 Anatomy and Physiology II
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 201
Continuation of BIO 201. An in-depth study of the structure and function of human organ systems and the relationships among physiologic systems at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A comprehensive understanding of how each system aids in the maintenance of homeostasis is stressed in the study of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Human cadaver dissections may be demonstrated in association with each organ system studied. Concurrent registration in BIO 252 is recommended.

BIO 204 Special Topics
1–4 credits
A course allowing for instruction in areas not included in the regular biology curriculum. Topics vary according to the expertise of individual instructors.

BIO 205 Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology
5 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 101 or BIO 102; CHE 101 or CHE 102 or CHE 103 or CHE 104
A systemic structure/function approach to the study of the human body that provides the background required for further study in applied physiology. Anatomy and physiology of integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, reproductive, respiratory, endocrine, and urinary systems will be studied. The laboratory parallels and reinforces lecture concepts through the use of models, histological studies, physiological exercises, and dissection of biological samples. This is a hybrid class; most lectures will be online. The face-to-face portion will include laboratory exercises, lecture review, case studies, and assessments.

BIO 206 Scientific Illustration
3 credits
(Also ART 206)
This course will help students develop an ability to produce effective illustrations of scientific subject matter for science classes, displays, learning centers, slide lectures, publications, advertisements, or other uses. The student will also gain an understanding of the differences between illustration and art, and of the importance of illustration as a form of communication. The students will increase their observational ability and will learn basic techniques of drawing in pen and ink, pencil and scratch board.

BIO 210 Fundamentals of Microbiology
3 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102; CHE 101 or CHE 103 or CHE 104
A comprehensive course in which students learn the structural characteristics and biological activities of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, and helminths. Particular emphasis is placed on those organisms that cause disease in humans and on the nature of the immune response in humans. A strong background in biology and understanding of Krebs cycle, transcription and translation is required. Students may not take both BIO 210 and BIO 311 for credit.

BIO 220 Introduction to Medical Terminology
2 credits
Provides information about common medical terms, definition and usage. The Systems Model is used to organize content and make it more meaningful for the development of medical vocabulary.

BIO 221 Fall Flora
1 credit
A study of the common flowering plant families, their identification, and their classification. Emphasis is placed on field study providing both scientific and aesthetic experiences. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

BIO 222 Spring Flora
1 credit
A study of the common flowering plant families, their identification, and their classification. Emphasis is placed on field study providing both scientific and aesthetic experiences. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

BIO 231 Botany
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
An extensive study of the plant kingdom and related organisms. Major topics include taxonomy, structure, morphology, development, physiology, reproduction, and evolution of plants. Ecological awareness is encouraged.

BIO 251 Anatomy and Physiology Lab I
1 credit
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 201
An optional one-credit lab to accompany BIO 201. Topics will correspond to lecture material, including cell physiology through nerve/muscle relationships.

BIO 252 Anatomy and Physiology Lab II
1 credit
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 202
An optional one-credit lab to accompany BIO 202. Topics will correspond to lecture material, including endocrine function through reproduction.

BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab
1 credit
Prerequisite: BIO 201
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 202
An optional one-credit lab to follow BIO 201 and accompany BIO 202. Topics will include aspects of the nervous system, skeleton-muscular system, cardiovascular system, and select other topics.

BIO 300 Biology Literature and Seminar
2 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 010 and BIO 020
A seminar based on the reading of current biological literature and the presentation of research seminars. In addition, students will prepare and present senior research proposals for a senior research project.

BIO 301 Genetics and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102 and CHE 201
Topics include transmission genetics, cytogenetics, population genetics, and quantitative genetics. Laboratory emphasizes experimental observation, experimental design, hypothesis testing, and scientific writing.

BIO 302 Cell and Molecular Biology
4 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102 and CHE 201
A lecture/laboratory course designed to shed light on the considerable research directed at understanding the chemical reactions occurring in the cell and the relationships they bear on cellular structure and function.

BIO 304 Field Study
1–2 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 104 or BIO 315
Individual study arranged between the student and the department chair to observe and evaluate some phase of environmental science in nature or industry or through a civil or county department. The student keeps a daily log, collects data, and does extensive reading for a written report and oral presentation for a seminar.

BIO 310 Invertebrate Zoology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A study of the biology and taxonomy of major invertebrate groups with special emphasis on structure-function relationships: their life histories, evolution, ecology, and economic importance. Laboratory sessions involve the observation and dissection of representative invertebrate organisms in order that a clear understanding of each taxonomic phylum may be attained.

BIO 311 Molecular and Physiological Microbiology
4 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102, CHE 201
An introduction to bacterial structure, metabolism, growth principles, genetics, and identification. Other topics covered include antibiotics, bacteriophage, and infectious diseases caused by bacteria. (Students may not take both BIO 210 and BIO 311 for credit.)

BIO 312 Developmental Biology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A study of progressive changes that occur within cells, tissues and organisms during their life span. Development at the molecular, biochemical, genetic, morphological, and physiological levels are examined through lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises.

BIO 315 Ecology
3 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A lecture course involving study of populations, communities, and individual organisms in relation to their environment. Abiotic and biotic factors, chemical cycles, population and community ecology, and succession are studied in depth. Interaction of organisms with physical and chemical components of the environment is stressed. Use of statistical methods in ecology is covered.

BIO 322 Vertebrate Zoology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A study of the evolution and comparative structure and function of the organ systems in all major groups of the phylum chordata. Laboratory work requires dissection of lamprey, shark, mud puppy, and cat with frequent reference to other representative vertebrates, especially humans.

BIO 324 Research Design and Biostatistics
5 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
An examination of the scientific method and how it is applied and misapplied. Major course objectives include experimental ethics and procedures as applied in the natural sciences, including experimental design, statistical assumptions, sample selection, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, analysis of results, and critical reading of scientific literature.

BIO 342 Ornithology and Lab
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
A survey of ornithology. Lectures cover the biology, evolution and ancestral relationships, migration, flight and flight-related structures and behavior. Behavior and identification of local birds is addressed in laboratory and on field trips.

BIO 360 Microbiology Laboratory
1 credit
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 210
An optional three-hour laboratory coordinated with BIO 210 lecture material designed to enhance the significant aspects of microbial metabolism and response to selective and differential media. Laboratory skills including aseptic technique and the proper handling and treatment of pathogens are included. Familiarity with a wide variety of specimens will help prepare nursing pre-professionals for future exposure to such microbes in their clinical experience.

BIO 365 Ecology Laboratory
1 credit
Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 102
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 315
This course is designed to accompany BIO 315 and offer a more quantitative approach to the study of ecology. The student is introduced to various ecological field and laboratory methods, including statistical analysis of data. Populations, habitat, communities, and productivity are analyzed, reinforcing the lecture material in BIO 315. Scientific report writing is stressed.

BIO 397 Internship
1–3 credits
A course designed to provide the student with field work experience through a work opportunity related to the student’s career objective. (This course will not count toward the biology major/minor without prior written permission of the department chair.)

BIO 402 Virology
3 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102, BIO 311, CHE 202
A study of virus history, molecular structure and function and epidemiology. Course content is derived from current, juried papers and web sites. Students will explore how viruses impact host cellular functions and will also look at current therapeutic and preventative regimes. An emphasis will be placed on new and emerging viral disease.

BIO 404 Special Topics
1–4 credits
A course allowing for instruction in areas not included in the regular biology curriculum. Material covered varies according to the expertise of individual instructors.

BIO 412 Neurobiology
4 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 201
An in-depth study of the concepts and principles of neurobiology. Students will understand how the science of neurobiology has emerged in recent decades as one of the most paramount fields of interest in biology. Lecture and laboratory stress development, plasticity, disorders, and research techniques, utilizing both invertebrate and vertebrate models. The lectures will include seminar-style readings of journal articles.

BIO 414 Independent Study
1–3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission
A course designed by the student, with an instructor’s guidance, to allow students of superior ability to pursue a topic of interest not available through regular courses.

BIO 422 Immunology
3 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 102, BIO 311, CHE 202
A study of several major topics in immunology. The topics include antibody structure, antigen–antibody reactions, generation of immune responses, antibody diversity, and cell-mediated immunity. The application of this information to laboratory assays and resistance to disease is also included.

BIO 425 Biology Senior Research I
1 credit
Prerequisite: BIO 300
The first of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty. Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest. In this course the student will refine research methods and experimental design, including data collection, and complete initial sections of the final written report.

BIO 426 Biology Senior Research II
1 credit
Prerequisite: BIO 425
The second of two courses that comprise an individually arranged research project under the guidance of department faculty. Each biology major elects to do laboratory/field research on a problem in biology of personal interest. In this course the student will collect and analyze data, finish and submit a written report, and do a public presentation of his or her research.

BIO 435 Human Anatomical Dissection and Demonstration
3 credits
Prerequisite: BIO 202 and permission
In-depth study of human anatomy via regional and systemic prosection of all major organ systems of a human cadaver, including the integumentary, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. This small group immersion course broadens the students' knowledge of both the anatomy and physiology of human systems. Students conduct review sessions with dissection demonstrations to small groups from the Anatomy and Physiology course, as well as to other classes, advanced high school biology students, and other interested groups. Each semester different dissections may be conducted and variations in the anatomy and/or pathology provide new learning. (repeatable for credit)

BIO 497 Internship
1–3 credits
A course designed to provide the student with field work experience through a work opportunity related to the student’s career objective. (This course will not count toward the biology major/minor without prior written permission of the department chair.)

Coffeehouse

Fun Fact

Marian’s coffeehouse proudly serves Starbucks coffee and other specialty beverages (Source: Sodexo Dining Services).

Campus Info

Marian University
45 S. National Ave.
Fond du Lac, WI 54935-4699

1-800-2-MARIAN
(1-800-262-7426)
admission@marianuniversity.edu

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