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Homeland Security Course Descriptions

36 credits:

COM 215   Introduction to Public Relations
3 credits
Students will be introduced to the profession of public relations — its practice, history, and legal and ethical issues. This includes how to communicate with various publics (community, consumers, employers, government, the media) for various purposes (education, political and social action, community relations, issues, and crisis management). Students will be encouraged to explore how public relations is practiced in their own disciplines.

CRJ 303   Law Enforcement Administration
3 credits
Prerequisite: CRJ 101
A survey course of police management practices and principles. The course is structured to provide the student with a comprehension and knowledge of the law enforcement profession, including administration, management, and supervision, and duties and functions therein. The course focuses on job descriptions and responsibilities, as well as law enforcement traditions, current trends and practices, and the future needs from an administrative and technical standpoint. Other topics covered include staff development, planning, budgeting, community relations, and legal aspects of administration. Application of decision-making and problem-oriented policing techniques are included in this course.

HOS 312   Crisis Intervention and Management
3 credits
Prerequisite: CRJ 101
Students will learn the role of crisis intervention and its management strategies necessary for their criminal justice career.  Professional communication will be integrated and reinforced throughout the course.  Students will be expected to apply these professional communication skills appropriately in (all) simulations. Students will also learn intervention principles, guidelines and techniques for criminal justice, public safety and health providers- about persons with possible mental disorders, alcohol or drug problems, dementia disorders, and/or developmental disabilities.  Strategies of crisis intervention will be discussed in their own right and within the contexts of: suicide and personal loss/bereavement as well as other crises of lethality; posttraumatic stress disorder, hostage situations and the catastrophic events that are related, and sexual assault and domestic violence (including both adult and child victims and the perpetrators of these crimes) as well as the current issue of school-based violence.

HOS 350   Principles of Professional Practice
3 credits
Prerequisite: CRJ 101 or CRJ 102
This course is a seminar in the major concepts of professionalism in criminal justice administration, and further, an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary for one to practically apply the theory and principles of professionalism and professional conduct in the environment of criminal justice practice.

HOS 405   Critical Perspectives of Disasters
3 credits
Prerequisite: SOC 100
This course examines assumptions people make about catastrophes by way in-depth analysis of the way social and cultural processes which shape the experience and understanding of catastrophe, whether natural, accidental, or intentional. Students will learn how disasters emerge from the convergence of hazard, risk, and the social construction of vulnerability. This course offers students an overview of a variety of natural and man-made disasters and how society prepared for, responded to, and recovered from specific events from multiple perspectives. In doing so, students will access case studies “scientific storytelling,” as well as research and their affects on “disaster theory.”  Students will gather an increased appreciation of the complexities associated with planning for and responding to natural and man-made disasters.

HOS 407   Critical Perspectives of Terrorism
3 credits
Prerequisite: SOC 100
This course will examine terrorism as a weapon of power, a forensic issue, and a social phenomenon. Types of terror, types of groups and governments involved in terror, and the people who become terrorists and their victims will be examined. Theories of political policy, group dynamics, and individual predilections will be evaluated so that terrorism can be understood to be combated. The course is designed to give students an overview of terrorism and its impact on American society. It will prepare students to understand the contemporary problems associated with terrorism and to anticipate problems society will face in the 21st century.

HSL 201   Introduction to Homeland Security
3 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide a primer on homeland security for emergency managers and related disciplines. Content first includes an overview of homeland security basic management concepts, replete with readings, discussions, and problems related to achieving homeland security.

HSL 212   Homeland Security Resource Management
3 credits
Prerequisite: HSL 201
This course provides an analysis of the processes important to the human and financial resource acquisition and management in homeland security agencies.  The course will examine (1) recruitment, selection, utilization and development of human resources, with emphasis on employee-management relations and relevant behavioral research; (2) the basic principles of public agency budgeting, including the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare, present and manage a public agency budget; and (3) the issues involved in the researching and writing of effective grant proposals.

HSL 305   Leadership and Organizational Management
3 credits
Prerequisite: HSL 201 or HSL 313
This course introduces students to leadership and management principles and practices, with a focus on homeland security agency administration examining the management of public safety agencies, as well as leadership theory. We will also examine the “people” side of government organizations and leadership in emergency operations.

HSL 313   Emergency Planning
3 credits
This course provides a general introduction to the methods, procedures, protocols, and strategies of emergency planning, with emphasis on situations in industrialized countries and the local level of organization (i.e. cities, municipalities, metropolitan areas, and small regions), though with ample reference to national and international levels. Rather than concentrating on the practices of any one country or state, the course focuses on general principles. 

HSL 350   Administrative Law
3 credits
Prerequisite: HSL 201 or HSL 313
This is a basic course in employment and labor law in the public sector, using the federal public sector as a model. It covers the key subjects one needs to function effectively in the public sector workplace. This course examines the form, organization, and function of administrative agencies in the context of a democratic constitutional system. The course looks at agency rulemaking, enforcement, and adjudication, and examines as well the legislative, executive, and judicial control of those functions.

HSL 495    Capstone Project in Homeland Security
3 credits
(Senior status or Homeland Security Leadership Certificate completion or permission.)
This course is the final in a six-course comprehensive certificate in leadership for homeland security. The capstone project will be an individual research, design, and implementation project chosen by each student.  Projects would be approved by the faculty member leading the capstone course. The expectation is that this would be a significant project acting as a capstone for their homeland security leadership education. Depending on the student's interest there may be more of a research and writing aspect to the work or possibly more design and implementation of software.  The projects would be structured with various deliverables during the semester and culminating with a colloquium at the end of the semester. The particular content of each presentation would be agreed upon in advance by each student (or sub-group) and the professor. The professor will arrange for each of the students taking the senior seminar to give presentations preferably at the end the term to the cohort, seminar groups, and any other interested faculty and students.

18 credits from the following:

CRJ 101   Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
3 credits
This course explores the three main subsystems of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The history, philosophy, structure, current issues, and future trends of these three main subsystems are presented, discussed, and studied using a cooperative learning approach. This course also identifies the functions and jurisdiction of Wisconsin law enforcement and criminal justice system agencies, and the sources and legal principles that form the foundation of Wisconsin criminal law. Additionally, belief systems, social pressures, moral problems, ethical decision making, and the consequences of decisions are discussed. This course identifies the resources available in communities to assist the criminal justice system. This course also covers Wisconsin requirements for written law enforcement agency policies and procedures.

CRJ 330   Crime Prevention and Community Safety
3 credits
This course examines crime prevention strategies and concepts. It emphasizes new and innovative approaches to preventing criminal behavior; and explores the legal, moral, and ethical considerations and problems of human and environmental manipulation in an interdisciplinary context.

CRJ 401   Police Community Relations
3 credits
This course addresses the interaction of law enforcement with the community and also presents an in-depth look into law enforcement itself. Primary review and discussion are focused on the following areas: diversity, facilitation and problem solving, and community policing strategies. Students will recognize the dynamics of a diverse society, identify hate crimes, recognize the role of problem solving within the community, apply principles of crime prevention, and understand the components of community policing.

HIS 206   History of Terrorism
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 102 or HIS 114
This course will examine the roots of terrorism in the 20th century, the current intellectual and governmental policies and theories regarding the nature and methods of terrorism, and the impact of terrorism in the past, present, and future.

HIS 207   History of Crime
3 credits
Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 102 or HIS 114
An examination of changes over time in concepts of justice, injustice, crime, and deviance.

HOS 204  Special Topics
1-3 credits
Selected topics relating to the field of homeland security are presented. The topics reflect the particular competencies and interests of program faculty taking into consideration the needs and requests of the students.

HOS 310  Criminology
3 credits
Prerequisite: CRJ 101
An overview of theories of crime. The following theories will be explored: classical, spiritual, and natural explanations; biological factors, psychological factors; control theories; deterrence theories; conflict theory; gender and crime; age and crime; and integrative

HOS 342   Research Methods
3 credits
Prerequisite: CRJ 214
This course presents the basic principles and methods of social science research. Students are introduced to techniques for critical analysis of the professional practice literature and how, as consumers, they can incorporate research findings in practice. Students also acquire knowledge and skills for applying research in their practice. Similarities between the research and problem-solving processes are identified, beginning with conceptualization of the research question, followed by determination of the appropriate design and methodology, and concluding with qualitative and quantitative data analysis and presentation of findings. Professional values and ethics, as well as sensitivity to human diversity, are subsumed within the conduct of research.

HOS 394   Homeland Security Field Experience
1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission
An upper-level practicum for students majoring in Homeland Security whose academic performance is judged adequate for placement. Practical work experience in a variety of homeland security-related agencies and organizations.

HOS 404   Special Topics
1-3 credits
Selected topics relating to the field of Homeland Security are presented. Topics reflect the particular competencies and interests of program faculty taking into consideration the needs and requests of the students.

HOS 420   Race, Gender, and Ethnicity
3 credits
Prerequisite: CRJ 101
The focus of this course is to study the nature and extent of racial, cultural, and gender issues as they pertain to criminal justice issues in America.  Furthermore, the class will attempt to distinguish the variability in past and existing criminal justice practices at each stage of the criminal justice system for minority groups.

HOS 494   Homeland Security Field Experience
1-3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission
An upper-level practicum for students majoring in homeland security whose academic performance is judged adequate for placement. Practical work experience in a variety of homeland security-related agencies and organizations.

MSC 101   Leadership and Military Science I
2 credits
This is an introductory course designed to focus on the fundamental components of service as an officer in the United States Army. Students are familiarized with individual values, leadership traits and the fundamentals of officer ship. Students also learn "life skills" of physical fitness, communication applications, both oral and written, as well as interpersonal relationships. The lab provides basic instruction on squad movement techniques and the six-squad tactical missions of patrolling, attack, defense, ambush, reconnaissance, and squad battle drills. Additionally, students learn basic map reading, first aid, physical fitness, and military formations to include basic marching techniques.

MSC 102   Leadership and Military Science II
2 credits
This course is an orientation to leadership theory and the fundamentals of the decision-making process by learning how to solve problems and develop critical thinking skills. Students develop leadership skills and the ability to learn goal-setting techniques while working in a group interaction setting. The lab continues to provide basic instruction on squad movement techniques and the six-squad tactical missions of patrolling, attack, defense, ambush, reconnaissance, and the squad battle drills. Students are introduced to the operations order format. Additionally, students learn basic map reading, physical fitness, and basic marching techniques.

MSC 201   Basic Leadership and Management I
3 credits
Prerequisite: MSC 101
Students learn how to resolve ethical problems by applying leadership theory and principles. Students learn self-development techniques such as the importance of stress management, time management, and the ability to solve problems. Lastly, students apply communication theory and skills in a leadership study focusing on problem solving. The lab applies basic leadership theory and decision-making during practical exercises in a field environment. Students continue to develop basic map reading, physical fitness, and basic marching techniques.

MSC 202   Basic Leadership and Management II
3 credits
Prerequisite: MSC 102
Students focus primarily on leadership with an extensive examination of the unique purpose, roles, and obligations of commissioned officers. Students also focus, in detail, on the origin of our institutional values and their practical application in the decision-making process and leadership theory. Students use case studies to learn the Army's ethical decision-making process. The lab continues to apply basic leadership theory and decision-making during practical exercises in a field environment. Students continue to develop basic map reading, physical fitness and basic marching techniques.

MSC 301   Advanced Leadership and Management I
4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission
Students are introduced to the Leader Development Program that will be used to evaluate their leadership performance and provide developmental feedback for the remainder of their cadet years.  Cadets are then taught how to plan and conduct individual and small unit training, as well as basic tactical principles.  Cadets will also learn reasoning skills and the military-specific application of these skills in the form of the army's troop.  The lab reinforces small-unit tactical training while employing the troop leading procedures to accomplish planning and decision-making.  Students continue to learn basic map reading, physical fitness and marching techniques.

MSC 302   Advanced Leadership and Management II
4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission
The course focus is doctrinal leadership and tactical operations at the small-unit level. Students are provided opportunities to plan and conduct individual and collective training for Army operations.  Synthesizing training, leadership and team building is the primary focus. Upon completion, students possess the fundamental confidence and competence of leadership in a small-unit setting. The lab continues reinforcing small-unit tactical training while employing the troop leading procedure to accomplish planning and decision-making. Students also continue basic map reading, physical fitness, and basic marching techniques.

MSC 401   Applied Leadership and Management I
4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission
This course concentrates on leadership, management, and ethics, and begins the final transition from cadet to lieutenant. Students focus on attaining the knowledge and proficiency in several critical areas they need to operate effectively as Army officers. These areas include coordinating activities with staff, counseling theory and practice within the "Army Context," training management, and ethics. The lab sharpens the students' leadership skills as they perform as cadet officers. Students develop and possess the fundamental skills, attributes, and abilities to operate as competent leaders in a cadet battalion. They must confidently communicate to subordinate cadets their preparedness to shoulder the responsibilities entrusted to them.

MSC 402   Applied Leadership and Management II
4 credits
Prerequisite: Permission
Students learn the legal aspects of decision-making and leadership. Instruction introduces the student to the organization of the Army from the tactical to the strategic level. Students learn administrative and logistical management focusing on the fundamentals of soldier and unit level support. Practical exercises require the student, both individually and collectively, to apply their knowledge to solve problems and confront situations commonly faced by junior officers. The lab continues to sharpen the students' leadership skills. Students normally change leadership positions to hone their skills, attributes, and abilities as leaders. Again, they must confidently communicate to subordinate cadets their preparedness to shoulder the responsibilities entrusted to them.

PHI 320   Philosophy of Law
3 credits
Prerequisite: PHI 130 or PHI 132
What is law? This is a philosophical investigation into the depths of human society to discover the very nature and idea of law. Law is something that humans require to live with one another, it effects all humans, has been around for thousands of years, yet it is any abstract idea that can seem quite complicated and difficult to grasp. This class will shine the light of thoughtful examination on: different theories of law and jurisprudence; the difference between legal rules and ethical norms; the rights of citizens and the state; the legality of civil disobedience; the need for liberty and the limits of law; the ideal form of judicial reasoning; and theories of punishment.

SWK 210   Statistical Techniques for Research Data Analysis
3 credits
Prerequisite: Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 001 with a grade of C or higher
An interdisciplinary introduction to the basic principles of data analysis with an emphasis on application. Students are expected to apply these principles to data analysis in their respective areas of study. The applied focus is on the computerized application of summary statistics, one-/two-/multi-sample tests, linear models, association tests, randomness/normality tests, and probability distributions, as used across a variety of community and organizational settings. Other techniques may be added as appropriate for specific disciplines.

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