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Homeland Security Course Descriptions

HOS 204  Special Topics

1-3 credits

Selected topics relating to the field of homeland security are presented. The topics reflect the particular competencies and interests of program faculty taking into consideration the needs and requests of the students.

HOS 214Statistical Techniques for Research Data Analysis

3 credits

(Also CRJ 214, PSY 210, SWK 210)

Prerequisites:  Appropriate math placement test score or MAT 001 with a grade of C or higher

An interdisciplinary introduction to the basic principles of data analysis with an emphasis on application.  Students are expected to apply these principles to data analysis in their respective areas of study. The applied focus is on the computerized application of summary statistics, one-/two-/multi-sample tests, linear models, association tests, randomness/normality tests, and probability distributions as used across a variety of community and organizational settings. Other techniques may be added as appropriate for specific disciplines.

 HOS 308  Criminology

3 credits

(Also CRJ 308)

Prerequisite: HSL 201

In this course, students will learn the role of communication in law enforcement and will develop and apply specific communication skills and the strategies in a variety of simulated situations. Students will also learn principles, guidelines, and techniques for law enforcement response to persons with possible mental disorders, alcohol or drug problems, dementia disorders, and/or developmental disabilities. Students will also learn the legal basis under the Wisconsin law for conducting emergency detentions and emergency protective placements of persons, as well as legal requirements and practical guidelines for implementing these procedures.

HOS 310  Criminology

3 credits

(Also CRJ 310)

Prerequisite: CRJ 101

An overview of theories of crime. The following theories will be explored: classical, spiritual, and natural explanations; biological factors, psychological factors; control theories; deterrence theories; conflict theory; gender and crime; age and crime; and integrative theories.

HOS 342  Research Methods

3 credits

(Also PSY 342, SWK 342)

Prerequisite: CRJ 214 or HOS 214 or PSY 210 or SWK 210

This course presents the basic principles and methods of social science research. Students are introduced to techniques for critical analysis of the professional practice literature and how, as consumers, they can incorporate research findings in practice. Students also acquire knowledge and skills for applying research in their practice. Similarities between the research and problem-solving processes are identified, beginning with conceptualization of the research question, followed by determination of the appropriate design and methodology, and concluding with qualitative and quantitative data analysis and presentation of findings. Professional values and ethics, as well as sensitivity to human diversity, are subsumed within the conduct of research.

HOS 350  Principles of Professional Practice

3 credits

(Also CRJ 350)

Prerequisites: CRJ 101 or 102

This course is a seminar in the major concepts of professionalism in criminal justice administration, and further, an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary for one to practically apply the theory and principles of professionalism and professional conduct in the environment of criminal justice practice.

 HOS 394  Homeland Security Field Experience

1-3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission

An upper-level practicum for students majoring in Homeland Security whose academic performance is judged adequate for placement. Practical work experience in a variety of homeland security-related agencies and organizations.

 HOS 404  Special Topics

1-3 credits

Selected topics relating to the field of Homeland Security are presented. Topics reflect the particular competencies and interests of program faculty taking into consideration the needs and requests of the students.

HOS 405  Sociology of Disasters

3 credits

Prerequisite: SOC 100

This course examines assumptions people make about catastrophes through an in-depth analysis of the way social and cultural processes can shape the experience and understanding of catastrophe, whether natural, accidental, or intentional. Students will learn how disasters emerge from the convergence of hazard, risk, and the social construction of vulnerability. This course offers students an overview of a variety of natural and man-made disasters and how society prepared for, responded to, and recovered from specific events from a sociological perspective. In doing so, students will access scientific storytelling, as well as social research and their effects on disaster theory. Students will gather an increased appreciation of the complexities associated with planning for and responding to natural and man-made disasters.

 HOS 407   Sociology of Terrorism

3 credits

Prerequisite: SOC 100

This course will examine terrorism as a weapon of power, a forensic issue, and a social phenomenon. Types of terror, types of groups and governments involved in terror, and the people who become terrorists and their victims will be examined. Theories of political policy, group dynamics, and individual predilections will be evaluated so that terrorism can be understood to be combated. The course is designed to give students an overview of terrorism and its impact on American society. It will prepare students to understand the contemporary problems associated with terrorism and to anticipate problems society will face in the twenty-first century.

 HOS 420   Race, Gender and Ethnicity in Criminal Justice

3 credits

(Also CRJ 420)

Prerequisite:  CRJ 101

The focus of this course is to study the nature and extent of racial, cultural, and gender issues as they pertain to criminal justice issues in America.  Furthermore, the class will attempt to distinguish the variability in past and existing criminal justice practices at each stage of the criminal justice system for minority groups.

 HOS 494   Homeland Security Field Experience

1-3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission

An upper-level practicum for students majoring in homeland security whose academic performance is judged adequate for placement. Practical work experience in a variety of homeland security-related agencies and organizations.

Schedule

Fun Fact

79% of adult students at Marian self-report that classes convenient in their working schedule (Source: Noel-Levitz Adult Student Priorities Survey, April 2014).

Campus Info

Marian University - Main Campus
45 S. National Ave.
Fond du Lac, WI 54935-4699

CALL: 1-800-2-MARIAN (1-800-262-7426)
EMAIL: admission@marianuniversity.edu  

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