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English Course Descriptions

ENG 001   Basic Writing

3 credits

An intensive study of the writing process and of the most difficult features of standard edited English. Students develop their skills in invention, organization, revision, and proofreading. They learn the conventions of Standard English concerning sentence boundaries, agreement of subjects and predicates, verb forms, contractions, possessives, agreement of pronouns, commas, and spelling. (This course is a pre-college level course and does not fulfill degree requirements.)

 ENG 103   Literary Magazine

0-1 credits

Students gain experience working on the publication of a literary magazine, with the opportunity to serve in a number of capacities: writing, producing artwork, reviewing and selecting submissions, and organizing layouts and design. ("0" credit receives CR/NC grade.)

ENG 105   Expository Writing

3 credits

Prerequisite: Appropriate English placement test score or ENG 001.

A course designed to enhance students' composition and critical thinking skills, by providing experiences with a range of writing strategies. This course will focus primarily on the writing of clear and thoughtful expository prose, as well as the identification and use of the rhetorical modes of development: narration, description, definition, division, classification, process analysis, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, and evaluation/analysis. Further, this class requires students to demonstrate their understanding of these rhetorical modes and their skill in employing them.  Students develop their awareness of the resources of language and of the stages in the writing process. The course aims to make students competent in standard edited English and to prepare them for the writing they will do in college and in their careers.

 ENG 106   Argumentative and Research Writing

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or appropriate English placement test score

A course introducing students to the principles of college research, with emphasis on analytical reading of research material, focused use of sources, and the methodology of citation and documentation. This course will focus primarily on the translation of critical reading and critical thinking into critical writing by reinforcing and expanding upon the rhetorical modes, the foundational mechanics, and the composition skills taught in the expository writing course, as well as the critical-thinking, critical-reading and library skills introduced in the First-Year Seminar. In this class, students refine their awareness of the resources of language and of the stages in the writing process. The course aims to make students proficient in standard edited English and to prepare them further for the writing they will do in college and in their careers.

 ENG 110   Masterpieces of Western Literature

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A study of the major writers and works that have influenced Western thought, arts, and culture from classical times through the Renaissance. The course offers students a broad perspective of literature prior to the 17th century. A survey of significant works leads to discussion of problems in the historical examination of literature: the definition of periods (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance), the relationships between society and literature, and the evolution of literary genres.

ENG 111   World Literature 17th-20th Century

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A study of major writers of Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the United States, with emphasis on writers of international stature and influence. The course offers students a broad perspective on literary history since the 17th century. A chronological survey of significant work leads to discussion of problems in the historical examination of literature: the definition of movements (such as neoclassicism, romanticism, realism), the relationships between society and literature, and the evolution of literary genres.

 ENG 112   Introduction to Literary Genres

1-3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A genre-based study of short stories, drama, and poetry; the course focuses on applying tools of literary analysis to the interpretation of specific works in order to increase insight and pleasure. A wide variety of works is read, representing a diversity of cultures, contexts, and perspectives. Course objectives also include developing critical reading, thinking, and writing skills, and exploring the values-laden nature of literature.

 ENG 113   Introduction to Mythology

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

Myth has been called "narrative that embodies and, in some cases, helps to explain the religious, philosophical, moral, and political values of a culture." The class will explore and examine important myths and legends from a variety of times and places. Readings will vary from semester to semester. Using methods of formal and structural analysis, students will study works of literature, such as epics, plays, and poetry, that employ mythological allusions and deal with universal symbols and themes.

ENG 201   British Literature to 1780

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

An examination of major early British writers, with a focus on the interplay of aesthetic, social and cultural values; the development of literary forms and traditions; and historical contexts. Writers examined include the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Dryden, Pope, and Swift.

 ENG 202   British Literature 1780-1970

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A wide-ranging investigation and analysis of early British Romanticism, Victorianism, and early Modernism. Writers examined include Austen, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, the Brontës, Browning, Tennyson and Dickens, Wilde, Conrad, Wolf, and Yeats. As with ENG 201, the course focuses on the interrelationships of aesthetic and cultural values, literary prose and historical contexts.

 ENG 204   Special Topics

1-3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

An in-depth exploration of a significant approach to literary criticism or the work of a major literary figure.

 ENG 211   American Literature to 1865

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A chronological study of American literature from its beginning to the Civil War, tracing the development of American writing in its cultural contexts. In lectures and discussions, students are introduced to a broad range of critical methods for approaching major American authors. The course is divided into three units: Colonies and Early Republic (Bradford to Irving), Literary Transcendentalism (Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman), and major writers of the American Renaissance (Hawthorne, Poe, Melville).

 ENG 212   American Literature 1865-1970

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A continuation of ENG 211, tracing the evolution of American literature from the Civil War to early Postmodernism in the contexts of the social and intellectual forces that shaped it, including the impact of minority writers. In lectures and discussions, students consider critical approaches to the rise of realism, naturalism, modernism, and the beginnings of postmodernism in American letters.

ENG 213   African-American Literature

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A generally chronological survey of African-American literature from its inception to the present time. The course is designed to include a diversity of themes, styles, authors and values. Students are challenged to examine their own attitudes and understanding regarding the relationship of African-American literature to American literature and culture as a whole.

 ENG 214   Studies of the Novel

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A close reading of novels of various lengths that focuses on the understanding of, appreciation for, and enjoyment of the novel as a distinct literary genre. While the specific works read vary from one semester to the next, students generally will explore and discuss significant works from the inception of the novel to the present.

 ENG 216   Contemporary Women's Literature: Emerging Voices in Fiction and Nonfiction

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A topical study of literature written by women, dealing with contemporary issues and concerns. This course will focus on fiction and nonfiction texts as they are emerging in modern and contemporary times. Discussion will center upon language, form, and themes as they relate to women. The course remains open-ended, in that any specialized concerns of class members will be welcomed as texts are chosen.

 ENG 217   Evolution of Women's Literature

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A survey of the evolution of women's literature. The course will focus upon literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, 17th and 18th centuries, 19th century and turn of the century, and Modernist and Contemporary eras written by female authors. This material will be integrated across genres and geographical contexts.

ENG 222   Business Communications

3 credits

An application of contemporary communication theory to practical business situations, and an application of traditional rhetoric and communication theory to oral presentations. Students study communication theory; practice basic forms of business writing; write, deliver, and evaluate public speeches; and explore communication systems in modern corporations.

ENG 230   Professional Composition and Research Writing

3 credits

(AGS students only)

A course designed to enhance students' composition and critical-thinking skills, by providing experiences with a range of writing strategies, with emphasis on expository and argumentative prose. Students develop an awareness of the resources of language and of the stages in the writing process. The course aims to help make students more competent in standard edited English and to prepare them for the writing they will do in college and in their careers. The course also introduces students to the principles of college research, with emphasis on analytical reading of research material, focused use of sources, and the methodology of citation and documentation. It acquaints students with techniques of interviewing and conducting surveys, as well as with search strategies involving resources in print. The course provides guidance for students as they apply research principles to subjects within their disciplines or areas of interest.

 ENG 301   Creative Writing

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

An introduction to the techniques of writing poetry, fiction, and drama. The course is taught as a workshop, with repeated presentation and discussion of works in progress. (Repeatable for credit).

 ENG 302   Shakespeare

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A survey of Shakespeare's major plays. While the emphasis is on close study of the individual works, students also consider Shakespeare's artistic development and the plays' historical contexts.

 ENG 304   Modern and Contemporary American Literature

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

An intense exploration of a wide variety of literature of modern and contemporary America, focusing on acclaimed authors, stylistic trends, thematic patterns, and a diversity of voices. This examination of the rich American literary tradition is used to gain deeper insight into the role of literature as an expression of a society's values and/or as a challenge to the values of the status quo.

ENG 312   Advanced Composition

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

A study of professional expository prose focusing on all aspects of the writing process, various types of writing, the importance of context, and the central role of audience awareness. Students write extensively and work with examples from business, government, and academic writing to perfect their skills.

 ENG 313   Advanced Study of Grammar

1 credit

A course that refines students' skills in all facets of grammar, punctuation, and mechanics necessary for personal and professional success. While the course presents the principles and structures underlying standard edited English, the focus is on students' application of those principles in their own writing.

 ENG 314   Modern and Contemporary British Literature

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

An intense exploration of a wide variety of literature of modern and contemporary Britain, focusing on acclaimed authors, stylistic trends, thematic patterns, and a diversity of voices. This examination of the rich British literary tradition is used to gain deeper insight into the role of literature as an expression of a society's values and/or as a challenge to the values of the status quo.

 ENG 324   Modern and Contemporary World Literature

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

An intense exploration of a wide variety of literature of the modern and contemporary world, focusing on acclaimed authors, stylistic trends, thematic patterns and a diversity of voices. This examination of the rich worldwide literary tradition is used to gain deeper insight into the role of literature as an expression of a society's values and/or as a challenge to the values of the status quo.

ENG 334   Introduction to Film

2-3 credits

A wide-angle view of a great variety of films from all eras, focusing on developing an awareness of and appreciation for film-making and film viewing as distinct artistic forms. The course facilitates the understanding and application of concepts of critical film analysis, as well as the relationship of film and literary analysis. The crucial role of film, a popular art form, as an expression and reflection of values, is emphasized throughout.

 ENG 397   Internship

1-3 credits

Students earn academic credit for internship work experiences as they test career choices, improve work skills and establish professional contacts. These experiences ultimately serve to directly tie students' academic coursework to non-academic professional experiences.

 ENG 402   Literary Criticism and Advanced Genre Studies

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

Through the study of literary theories and schools of criticism, students deepen and consolidate their knowledge of literary genres, traditions, and terminology. Students reflect upon and refine their own prose by reading and discussing works in which influential writers examine aspects of the writing process. Research and analytical skills are also strengthened as students compose papers - shared in a seminar setting - in which they apply critical theories to specific works of literature.

 ENG 404   Special Topics

1-3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

An in-depth exploration of a significant approach to literary criticism or the work of a major literary figure. Recent course offerings have included Literature of the Avant-Garde and Contemporary Literary Theory.

ENG 406   Seminar in Fiction Writing

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

Students will investigate the techniques of composing short stories and other forms of fiction, research the stylistics of fiction, and present original works in a seminar setting.

 ENG 408   Seminar in Poetry Writing

3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG 105 or 230

Students will investigate the techniques of composing poems, research the stylistics of poetry, and present original works in a seminar setting.

 ENG 412   Introduction to Language

3 credits

A survey of types of linguistic study, including phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Students become more aware of the universal features of language, the history of the English language, social and political variations in language use, and theories and stages of child language acquisition. Applications are made to the students' vocational areas in papers that are shared in a seminar setting.

ENG 414   Independent Study

1-3 credits

Prerequisite: Permission

A course designed by the student with an instructor's guidance to allow students of superior ability to pursue a topic of interest not available through regular courses.

ENG 432   Rhetorical Theory and Application

3 credits

An introduction to major contemporary and historical rhetorical theory, with a focus on the application of those theories in contemporary communication situations. Theorists discussed range from the sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, and Augustine, to Richards, Booth, Kenneth Burke, Lukacs, Barthes, Derrida, and DeMan. Areas of discussion are extremely broad, including classical, practical, elocutionary, belletristic, psychological, epistemological, situational, Marxist, pragmatic, feminist, and deconstructionist criticism of discourses of public and private institutions, business, religion, contemporary mass culture, social movements, politics, discussions of war and technology, issues of class, the arts, and gender-related communication.

 ENG 497   Internship

1-3 credits

Students earn academic credit for internship work experiences as they test career choices, improve work skills, and establish professional contacts. These experiences ultimately serve to directly tie students' academic coursework to non-academic professional experiences.

96 Percent

Fun Fact

96% of Marian students participate in educationally driven internships and research in their majors, giving them experience that can be applied after graduation.

Campus Info

Marian University - Main Campus
45 S. National Ave.
Fond du Lac, WI 54935-4699

CALL: 1-800-2-MARIAN (1-800-262-7426)
EMAIL: admission@marianuniversity.edu  

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